< On this Page
On This Page ×

Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers in Utah

Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers in Utah

If you are considering an addiction rehab center in Utah, you are not alone. With its deeply-rooted religious foundation and strong reputation for traditional, family-centered values, it may come as a surprise to many that Utah has not escaped the devastation of substance abuse and drug addiction affecting the rest of the United States. This is true not only in terms of overall drug use, but also regarding the opioid epidemic sweeping the nation. Here are just a few distressing facts and figures:

    • In 2016, Utah suffered a total of 635 drug overdose deaths. That’s an age-adjusted rate of 22.2 deaths per 100,000 people, ranking Utah 20th in the nation in terms of overdose deaths. And although Utah’s ranking in 2016 was substantially lower than in previous years (7th in 2014 and 9th in 2015), the rates and total of numbers of deaths have remained steady through those years, meaning that conditions in the state regarding drug overdoses have not actually improved. [Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ]

  • Eighty percent of heroin abusers in Utah started with the use of prescription opioids. [Source: Utah Department of Health]
  • Utah experienced a nearly 400 percent increase in deaths resulting from the abuse and misuse of prescription drugs between 2000 and 2015. [Source: Utah Department of Health]
  • Between 2013 and 2015, deaths from prescription drug overdoses in Utah outpaced those resulting from falls, firearms, and motor vehicle accidents. [Source: CDC]

While opioids have become the immediate focus of attention Utah drug rehabilitation programs, it’s important to remember that other substances, such as cocaine, benzodiazepines, methamphetamine, and alcohol, remain dangerous threats to state residents. And the recent appearance of synthetic compound “designer drugs” is becoming a major concern of governmental authorities and medical personnel alike, as well as Utah rehab programs.

Read More

Expert

Mark B. Kastleman
View Bio

If you are considering an addiction rehab center in Utah, you are not alone. With its deeply-rooted religious foundation and strong reputation for traditional, family-centered values, it may come as a surprise to many that Utah has not escaped the devastation of substance abuse and drug addiction affecting the rest of the United States. This is true not only in terms of overall drug use, but also regarding the opioid epidemic sweeping the nation. Here are just a few distressing facts and figures:

  • In 2016, Utah suffered a total of 635 drug overdose deaths. That’s an age-adjusted rate of 22.2 deaths per 100,000 people, ranking Utah 20th in the nation in terms of overdose deaths. And although Utah’s ranking in 2016 was substantially lower than in previous years (7th in 2014 and 9th in 2015), the rates and total of numbers of deaths have remained steady through those years, meaning that conditions in the state regarding drug overdoses have not actually improved. [Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ]
  • Eighty percent of heroin abusers in Utah started with the use of prescription opioids. [Source: Utah Department of Health]
  • Utah experienced a nearly 400 percent increase in deaths resulting from the abuse and misuse of prescription drugs between 2000 and 2015. [Source: Utah Department of Health]
  • Between 2013 and 2015, deaths from prescription drug overdoses in Utah outpaced those resulting from falls, firearms, and motor vehicle accidents. [Source: CDC]

While opioids have become the immediate focus of attention Utah drug rehabilitation programs, it’s important to remember that other substances, such as cocaine, benzodiazepines, methamphetamine, and alcohol, remain dangerous threats to state residents. And the recent appearance of synthetic compound “designer drugs” is becoming a major concern of governmental authorities and medical personnel alike, as well as Utah rehab programs.

Find Substance Abuse & Mental Health facilities in the United States

Search by location, substance, disease, etc

Basic Search
REFINE SEARCH
Search by Substance
Mental Health or Substance Abuse
Languages served
Age / Groups served
Facilities Operation (Public / Private)
Showing results
Show
Facility Name Address State City Phone Website

By the Numbers: Fighting Addiction in Utah

The Utah State Legislature has been busy over the past several years putting forward a number of bills aimed at combating substance abuse issues within the state, most particularly the opioid crisis. Among those bills are:

House Bill 11 (2014) allows bystanders to an overdose to report that overdose (to law enforcement or emergency medical professionals, for example) without the fear of being prosecuted for possession of an illicit substance themselves.

House Bill 50 (2017) limits the number of days for which an opiate may be prescribed for certain individuals.

House Bill 175 (2017) requires prescribers to complete training in a nationally-recognized opioid screening method.

House Bill 119 (2014) permits doctors to prescribe naloxone or similarly acting “opiate antagonists” to individuals at increased risk of an opiate-related overdose, as well as to family members, friends, and others in a position to assist someone at increased risk.

House Bill 286 (2017) establishes a process that allows family members to intervene and petition for the court-ordered intervention and treatment of an individual suffering from a substance use disorder.

Snapshot: Utah Drug Rehabilitation Programs

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) reports the following Utah drug rehab stats:

Total Rehabilitation Facilities
Utah

211

Salt Lake City

89

Provo

34

Ogden

29

St. George

10

Layton

30

Inpatient Rehab Programs
Utah

63

Salt Lake City

23

Provo

12

Ogden

5

St. George

3

Layton

4

Outpatient Rehab Programs
Utah

169

Salt Lake City

75

Provo

24

Ogden

25

St. George

6

Layton

27

Veterans Rehab Programs
Utah

54

Salt Lake City

30

Provo

11

Ogden

4

St. George

1

Layton

3

Rehabs that Accept Medicare
Utah

62

Salt Lake City

27

Provo

8

Ogden

9

St. George

1

Layton

9

Rehabs that Accept Medicaid
Utah

89

Salt Lake City

41

Provo

14

Ogden

10

St. George

2

Layton

11

Rehabs that Accept Private Insurance
Utah

173

Salt Lake City

73

Provo

28

Ogden

21

St. George

6

Layton

21

10 Top Alcohol and Drug Rehab Centers in Utah

The following programs are among some of the best drug treatment centers in Utah.

Red Willow Counseling & Recovery

ADDRESS:

Trolley Corners Building
515 South 700 East
Salt Lake City, UT 84102

PHONE:

(385) 313-0055

Red Willow Counseling & Recovery

Located in the Central City neighborhood of Salt Lake City, Red Willow Counseling & Recovery provides a range of outpatient therapy and treatment-related services, including addiction intervention, drug and alcohol assessment, as well as individual, group, family, and couples therapy for substance abuse and drug and alcohol addiction. In addition to substance abuse and process disorders, Red Willow specializes in the treatment of a wide variety of mental illnesses, including anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder. Numerous private insurance plans are accepted, and Red Willow offers a sliding scale fee payment option.

Action Recovery Group

ADDRESS:

1708 East 5550 South #23
Ogden, UT 84403

PHONE:

(801) 475-4673

Action Recovery Group

Boasting a staff with over 100 years of combined experience in the alcohol and drug addiction treatment field, Action Recovery Group in South Ogden provides the self-described “4 essentials of addiction treatment and recovery”: detoxification, intensive day treatment, an intensive evening treatment program, and aftercare. Action Recovery’s affordable programs feature a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy, wellness, and the 12-step modality of treatment. A free clinical assessment is available to anyone concerned about a substance abuse problem that is designed to assess and understand the individual’s level of dependence or addiction and determine the most effective form of treatment.

Pomarri Drug Rehab & Addiction Center

ADDRESS:

1472 East 820 North
Orem, UT 84097

PHONE:

(801) 441-3211

Pomarri Drug Rehab & Addiction Center

Pomarri Drug Rehab & Addiction center offers a variety of outpatient drug and alcohol detoxification and treatment services at their Orem location. Detoxification programs last from eight to 12 weeks on the belief that a longer detox episode results in lower relapse rates. Intensive outpatient programs are available both during the day and in the evening. Pomarri additionally offers court-ordered drug classes, including substance abuse assessment and treatment programs. Out-of-network insurance from a variety of providers is accepted, and Pomarri offers payment on a sliding fee scale.

Next Level Recovery/Sober Living Properties

ADDRESS:

6771 South 900 East
Salt Lake City, UT 84047

PHONE:

(877) 890-0248

Next Level Recovery/Sober Living Properties

Next Level Recovery (NLR) provides a number of evidence-based outpatient alcohol and substance abuse services at its Salt Lake City facility. NLR designs a patient-centered treatment plan for each individual, employing a “whole-life” approach that includes relationships, career, health and psychological well-being. NLR features a specific program for young adults and adults to assist with challenges associated with neurological differences. NLR partners with its sister-company, Sober Living Properties (SLP), which provides affordable sober housing at five locations along the Wasatch Front. NLR/SLP accepts most insurance plans and offers a variety of programs designed to help funding, including zero percent financing for a minimum of 12 months, as well as full and partial scholarships.

Recovery Ways

ADDRESS:

385 West 4800 South
Murray, UT 84123

PHONE:

(888) 986-7848

Recovery Ways

Recovery Ways offers a continuum of care for all patients with a range of programs that include medically supervised inpatient detoxification, inpatient residential treatment, intensive outpatient (IOP), partial hospitalization (PHP), and sober living. PHP and IOP services are provided as primary or step-down care as determined by assessment based on medical necessity. Additional services include aftercare, an alumni recovery support program, virtual IOP, and TeleHealth technology that allows patients to receive therapy, counseling, and pharmacological management via the internet. Noting that veterans with a substance abuse problem often additionally suffer with co-occurring PTSD, Recovery Ways treats veterans with addiction and PTSD issues.

Youth Care Treatment Center

ADDRESS:

12595 S. Minuteman Dr.
Draper, UT 84020

PHONE:

(877) 395-5008

Youth Care Treatment Center

Located in Draper, approximately 20 miles south of Salt Lake City, Youth Care Treatment Center treats adolescents between the ages of 11 and 18 for a range of issues, including substance abuse, and mood and behavioral disorders. Programs offered include residential, partial hospitalization (PHP), behavior modification, family treatment, and recreational treatment. Treatment may also include experiential rehab therapies. Youth Care also offers a fully-accredited academic program staffed by certified secondary and special education teachers with specialized training for working with students with learning and behavioral difficulties. All Youth Care students additionally participate in community service activities at least twice each month.

Annie's House

ADDRESS:

1601 East 13200 South
Draper, UT 84020

PHONE:

(385) 255-9117

Annie's House

Annie’s House is an alcohol and drug addiction recovery center owned by, run by, and exclusively for women. Its stated mission is to “provide women with a safe, healthy, and productive environment, committed to the continuing success and spiritual growth of those desiring to live clean, sober, and addiction-free, one day at a time.” Both inpatient residential and flexible day treatment programs are available. Annie’s House understands that affordability is often a determining factor for women in deciding whether or not to seek help, and strives to ensure that excellent care is within the reach of every woman.

Discovery House Comprehensive Treatment Centers of Utah

ADDRESS:

49 East 2100 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84115

PHONE:

(844) 505-4490

Discovery House Comprehensive Treatment Centers of Utah

The Discovery House Comprehensive Treatment Center in Salt Lake City provides comprehensive care to both adult men and women who have been suffering with an opioid addiction problem for one year or longer. Treatment consists of a combination of medication assisted treatment (Methadone, Subutex, Suboxone) and evidence-based therapeutic interventions (individual, group, and family counseling). This comprehensive treatment approach enables patients to “combat both the physical and psychological components that have previously tainted their abilities to overcome their addictions.” Discovery House accepts Medicaid and most private insurance plans. In addition to its Salt Lake City center, Discovery House three additional locations in Orem, Layton, and Taylorsville.

The Haven

ADDRESS:

974 E. South Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84102

PHONE:

(801) 533-0070

The Haven

The Haven is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization providing treatment for substance abuse disorders since 1969. Located near downtown Salt Lake City, The Haven is offers both residential and sober living services to men and women suffering from drug and alcohol addiction. Its stated mission is to provide “effective and affordable treatment services based on an individual’s need, rather than their ability to pay.” Programs at The Haven are peer-driven, with a strong emphasis on the group therapy process and dual diagnosis, treating mental illness issues along with substance abuse disorders. The Haven also features a large community of alumni support.

Cirque Lodge

ADDRESS:

3114 E. Ida’s Road
Sundance, UT 84604

PHONE:

(801) 222-9200

Cirque Lodge

Cirque Lodge is a 16-bed private luxury alcohol and drug rehab in Utah, located directly below the Cascade Cirque in the Wasatch Range of the Utah Rocky Mountains. Treatment services include detoxification and residential inpatient programs, among others. Treatment modalities employed at Cirque Lodge include experiential therapy, cognitive therapy, multi-systemic family therapy, and a vigorous 12-step component. A wide range of luxury amenities are provided, including equine therapy, art therapy, yoga, meditation, hiking, snowshoeing, fishing, rafting, and more. Cirque Lodge also operates The Studio, a 44-bed luxury center located at the foot of Mount Timpanogos in Orem.

Paying for Utah Drug Rehabilitation

The patient’s price tag for treatment at a Utah rehabilitation center will vary significantly depending on the type, length, and extent of coverage. And all of this itself is dependent on a variety of factors, including substance or substances abused, severity of the abuse, type of treatment center (public non-profit or private for-profit), geographic location and – unfortunately – ability to pay.
The good news is that most rehabilitation centers in Utah are ready and willing to work with clients to find ways to make treatment affordable, and that typically involves a combination of payment methods, including:

  • Private Insurance: A major source of financing rehab in Utah. Today, because of the Affordable Care Act, virtually all insurance plans provide at least partial coverage for substance abuse treatment. Level of coverage varies by plan, so it’s important to check your policy carefully.
  • Public Insurance: Medicaid covers a broad range of treatment services, including detoxification, medication, and residential and outpatient programs. Medicare also covers costs of substance abuse treatment in some cases.
  • Self-Pay: Individuals seeking care will typically be responsible for paying some part of their treatment costs out of their own pockets. Most Utah rehabs accept self-pay from a number of sources, including credit cards, loans, contributions from friends and family, and cash.
  • Other options: Many rehab centers in Utah help make treatment more affordable by offering sliding fee scales, where charges are based on the client’s income level, and through scholarships and grants that cover all or part of treatment costs. For information on state services, including how to pay for rehab in Utah, go to this Substance Abuse & Mental Health government agency site or call the Substance Abuse agency in your county. Contact information can be found here.

Expert Q&A with Utah Drug Rehab Expert Mark B. Kastleman

About Mark B. Kastleman, BCC, BCPC, Action Recovery Group
About Mark B. Kastleman, BCC, BCPC, Action Recovery Group

Mark B. Kastleman, BCC, BCPC, is the Executive Director for Action Recovery Group, a substance abuse IOP in Ogden Utah. Mark is also a Board Certified Clinical Chaplain and Pastoral Counselor with a specialty in sexual addiction treatment.  

  • What is Action Recovery Group?

    We are an intensive outpatient program and we treat alcohol and drug addiction. We are a small, local operation in Ogden, Utah, which is an area with a very long history of substance abuse and alcohol issues. So, a fairly small town with a lot of very big problems. 

  • Tell us a bit about those problems. What are the substances that you are seeing the most in Utah? Are you seeing any major addiction trends?

    That one’s pretty easy. The biggest trend that we’re seeing here in our local area, as well as Utah and I think in many areas of the country, is the very big spike in opiate use. It’s coming in two forms. One is individuals who are hooked in some way on prescription pain killers of various shapes and sizes. And when they either run out of a prescription or can’t afford them anymore, they turn to the much cheaper version: heroin.

  • What about other substances?

    We still see a general mix of the other typical drugs, you know, cocaine and meth. But it’s pretty minor compared to the opioid epidemic. And I’m not seeing as much anymore with regard to alcohol, which is interesting. In fact, I was talking with my clinical director about that last week, and I said, “Why do you suppose it is that we’re seeing fewer and fewer people in here for alcohol addiction?” And his insight on it was that alcohol has really traditionally been the drug of choice for the older generation, and it’s just not nearly as popular among the younger crowd. Yes, there are still social drinkers. They’ll use alcohol to enhance their other drug use. But we’re seeing less and less where that’s the primary.

  • What do you think led to doctors prescribing more opioids?

    I think people began to request it more and more. It just became an expectation. I even notice in my own personal life, going to a dental procedure or some minor thing. Doctors have been pretty ready and willing to prescribe pain pills. And not just one or two, it’s a full on prescription, fifteen or twenty pills. And I think that a lot of people who don’t end up using those, they end up in the medicine cabinet. And what we’ve seen a lot here are teens finding those and then taking them to school and selling them. 

  • Are you seeing an increase in the use of fentanyl?

    Yes, we are. It may be the most disturbing trend we’ve ever seen, just because fentanyl is so incredibly potent. There’s no quality control, you really don’t know what you’re getting. Most of it is coming out of China. And we’re finding that it can kill people instantly. I mean, the OD rate for fentanyl is really skyrocketing. It’s just a wild horse that is really causing us great concern. 

  • Are you seeing a mix of heroin and fentanyl in your area?

    Yeah, it’s giving the heroin a bigger kick and bringing the price down even further because fentanyl is so cheap. You can even buy the stuff online and use it to put in other things. And it’s just incredibly inexpensive. That’s the other part that’s really given it a foothold. 

  • What do you see looking forward, and what would you like to see change to make things better?

    I don’t see this epidemic slowing down, I really don’t. You know, I think that we can put up billboards, put out all kinds of messages, but just as we’ve seen in the schools over a long time – programs like the DARE program, where kids are told about the dangers – the rate of addiction has not slowed down because of those information campaigns. We need more treatment options for people, we need them to be made more available in our communities. And I would like to see the government come in with some real, in-the-trenches things to help with treatment availability. Standard insurance is just not going to get it done anymore. We’re all just trying to keep our heads above water, meeting the demand and the need, that no one has the time to strategically step back and look at what needs to happen with this long-term. It’s going to be interesting to see what happens over the next few years.