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Drug & Alcohol Rehab Centers in Texas

Drug & Alcohol Rehab Centers in Texas

Unlike the northeastern part of the United States, heroin and other opiates are not the biggest drug problem in Texas. While they are the second and third largest threats in the Lone Star State, methamphetamines remain the number one danger, especially since the price has dropped dramatically and “Liquid Meth” is one of the easiest substance to transport over the border. The University of Texas at Austin’s Steve Hicks School of Social Work bases its research on reports from the 18 Drug Enforcement Agency offices based in Texas that also report methamphetamine seizures at the Texas-Mexico borders have surged 103% in the last three years.

Expert

Jane Carlisle Maxwell
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Unlike the northeastern part of the United States, heroin and other opiates are not the biggest drug problem in Texas. While they are the second and third largest threats in the Lone Star State, methamphetamines remain the number one danger, especially since the price has dropped dramatically and “Liquid Meth” is one of the easiest substance to transport over the border. The University of Texas at Austin’s Steve Hicks School of Social Work bases its research on reports from the 18 Drug Enforcement Agency offices based in Texas that also report methamphetamine seizures at the Texas-Mexico borders have surged 103% in the last three years.

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By the Numbers: Meth Abuse in Texas

  • 715 methamphetamine deaths/539 heroin deaths in Texas in 2016

    Method of use:

    • 53% smoking
    • 33% injecting
    • 10% inhaling (10%)
  • Admissions to methamphetamine treatment programs:

    • 3% of all admissions in 1995
    • 11% in 2007
    • 8% in 2009
    • 17% of admissions in 2016
  • Demographics:

    • 77% White
    • 18% Hispanic
    • 4% were Black
    • Average age was 33
    • 44% male

More Texas Drug Trends

While heroin seizures have decreased minimally, the University of Texas at Austin research points to the DEA again, revealing production of the drug in Mexico is increasing to keep up with high demands in the U.S. This includes the appearance of fentanyl powder in 2016 which is being blended with other opiates and benzodiazepines. Reemerging use of codeine cough syrup and promethazine syrup is being reported statewide as well. The most prevalent misuse of benzodiazepine is with Xanax or its generic Alprazolam. When mixed with hydrocodone and carisoprodol, the abused substance is known as the “Houston Cocktail” or “Holy Trinity.”

Cocaine and marijuana round out the more popular substances in Texas, as reported by The University of Texas at Austin. Widespread among the homeless, the use crack cocaine, synthetic cannabinoids and an increase in powder cocaine is expected to continue to increase due to various factors. While marijuana seizures are down at the Texas-Mexico border, many DEA offices are reporting it still as a top threat due to decriminalization and the changes in usage, including electronic cigarettes.

Fast facts: Texas Drug Rehab & Initiatives

In September 2017, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton announced that Texas has joined a bi-partisan group of 40 states in issuing subpoenas and other investigative requests of eight pharmaceutical companies that manufacture prescriptive painkillers. “We’ll determine an appropriate course of action once it’s determined what role these companies may have played in creating or prolonging the opioid crisis,” said Paxton.

Texas House Speaker Joes Straus proclaimed the formation of the House Select Committee on Opioid and Substance Abuse in October of 2017. The 13-member committee is tasked with the following: “not later than November 1, 2018, develop and present concrete principles and action items to reduce the scourge of opioids in Texas and to provide legislative solutions to address these issues, as well as examine other issues related to substance abuse in Texas.”

The Texas Legislature enacted new reporting requirements for all controlled substances in schedules II-V changing the time frame from seven days to the next business day after pharmacies fill prescriptions, effective September 1, 2017.

Coordinated Training Services of Texas is a resource of coalitions in Texas that work against drug abuse. It also offers workshops, online training and other current information on substance abuse prevention.

By the Numbers: Texas Rehabilitation Centers
Total Rehab Centers in Texas

396

Long-term Rehab

91

Veteran Programs

74

Inpatient

28

Certified Opioid

59

Medicare

64

Outpatient

331

Transitional Housing

23

Medicaid

244

Short-term Rehab

81

Adolescent Programs

110

Private Insurance

244

By Metro
Dallas

29

Houston

49

Austin

22

Fort Worth

26

San Antonio

24

Top 10 Rehabilitation Facilities in Texas

The following Texas rehabilitation centers offer a wide range of treatment options and settings, ranging from flexible urban programs in larger metro markets to specialized treatment centers in more secluded settings.

Cenikor

ADDRESS:

2209 South Main Street
Fort Worth, Texas 76110

PHONE:

(817) 921-2771

Cenikor

The Fort Worth location specializes in long-term adult inpatient treatment focused on all aspects of recovery and rehabilitation. Education and workforce training is stressed with focus on housing, transportation, aftercare support, social skill development and financial stability.

Memorial Hermann Prevention and Recovery Center (PaRC)

ADDRESS:

3043 Gessner
Houston, Texas 77080

PHONE:

(713) 939-7272 

Memorial Hermann Prevention and Recovery Center (PaRC)

Serving rehabilitation treatment to patients with chronic pain, alcoholism and other addictions for 30 years, PaRC is part of the award winning Memorial Hermann Health System. This Houston-based rehabilitation center offers a varied menu of services and levels of care including detox, residential, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and aftercare for teens through adults. Targeted programs also include executive/professional and painkiller addiction recovery.

San Antonio Recovery Center

ADDRESS:

5806 Culebra Road
San Antonio, Texas 78228

PHONE:

(866)514-0275

San Antonio Recovery Center

Billing itself as “not your typical treatment center,” San Antonio Recovery Center was founded in 2010 and offers a wide range of services including detox referrals, residential and inpatient programs, separate men’s and women’s drug addiction rehab and the 12-step approach. A special focus on yoga and wellness, nutrition, spirituality and meditation are also incorporating into the rehabilitation process.

Sunspire Health Texas

ADDRESS:

3800 County Road 444
Princeton, Texas 75407

PHONE:

(858)703-4135

Sunspire Health Texas

Set on a large property north of Dallas, Sunspire Health Texas offers seclusion and unique amenities such as equine therapy and yoga. Part of a nationwide network of facilities that began in Florida, Sunspire Health offers a continuum of rehabilitation services including detox and residential and outpatient care with a special focus on opioid addiction. Complimentary services to promote healing and full recovery are also available.

Greenhouse Treatment Center

ADDRESS:

1171 107th Street
Grand Prairie, Texas 75050

PHONE:

(972)848-0265

Greenhouse Treatment Center

The treatment program for veterans at Greenhouse incorporates a holistic approach by a diverse team of specialized professionals. Beginning with an initial assessment to identify any co-occurring mental health disorders, common disorders such as PTSD and depression will be treated separately but concurrently.

Cedar Crest Hospital

ADDRESS:

3500 S Ih-35 
Belton, Texas 76513

PHONE:

(855)844-0551

Cedar Crest Hospital

Located on 33 beautiful, rolling acres in the central part of the state, Cedar Crest Hospital offers chemical dependency rehabilitation for both children and adolescents with companion treatment for those struggling with concurrent disorders. The tranquil, home-like setting offers many outdoor amenities to encourage problem solving, self-worth and coping skills such as a ropes course, gym, swimming pool and walking trails. Visits from family and loved ones are encouraged with a focus on returning successfully to typical home and school environments.

Awakenings Hill Country

ADDRESS:

184 Fullbrook Lane
Fredericksburg, Texas 78624

PHONE:

(830)997-2675

Awakenings Hill Country

Awakenings Hill Country is a Texas rehabilitation center focused on women and their specific biological, social and environmental needs. A dedicated team of professionals are focused on treatment of women addicted to heroin, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, and prescription painkillers. Unique services include a faith-based program and an equine therapy program.

Opiate Treatment Centers of America

ADDRESS:

9846 Lorene
San Antonio, Texas 78216

PHONE:

(210)340-0049

Opiate Treatment Centers of America

This Texas rehabilitation center is focused on the latest in opioid addiction treatment and pharmacogenetic testing to prescribe the best type and dosage of medication for each specific patient. This type of DNA testing is also applied to treating any other co-occurring disorders, to be more specific and accurate in each patient’s recovery.

Nexus Recovery Center Inc.

ADDRESS:

8733 La Prada Drive
Dallas, Texas 75228

PHONE:

(214)321-0156

Nexus Recovery Center Inc.

Specializing in treatment for low-income women and girls ages 13-17, Nexus provides a full continuum of recovery services and welcomes mothers and their children with a belief that payment should not be a barrier to care and rehabilitation. Accredited by the Joint Commission since 2006, Nexus combines both inpatient and outpatient treatment with ongoing support throughout the recovery journey. A special focus is placed on life-skill and vocational training.

Discovery Point Retreat

ADDRESS:

530 Hight Road
Waxahachie, TX, 75167

PHONE:

(888)988 9207

Discovery Point Retreat

Located on a ranch that lies 30 miles to the south of Dallas, this peaceful retreat has many amenities for up to 20 residential patients. Outside of treatment, participants can enjoy a community lounge with a fireplace and a 24-hour kitchen with a chef. The ranch also includes many amenities such as a fishing pond, salon, swimming pool, basketball court and full gym. Activities also include outings to various Dallas-area events such as sports and concerts, reinforcing the ability to have fun without addictive substances.

Paying for Rehab Centers in Texas

A first step in rehabilitation in Texas is OSARS (Outreach, Screening, Assessment and Referral Centers). Those in need may be screened at one of 11 regional offices and assessed and referred in terms of treatment needs and financial ability. Texas residents in need of rehab services are encouraged to call according to geographic location for immediate and confidential assistance 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, currently there are 64 Texas rehabilitation centers that accept Medicare and 244 that accept Medicaid. Private insurance is accepted at 244 treatment centers in Texas.

Payment, however, may not be the only barrier to service for some Texas residents. Border communities have a history of challenges. Not only is there a lack of substance abuse services but also professionals to keep up with the needs. Thankfully, a DSHS funded grant has made possible the Rural Border Intervention (RBI) program. Targeting low-income housing communities in border areas where a higher risk for substance abuse issues may exist, the goal of RBI is to offer easy access to behavioral and substance abuse services, including prevention and intervention. Counties served include Starr, Willacy, Zapata, Brooks, Duval and Jim Hogg.

Q&A With a Texas Drug Rehab Expert

About Jane Carlisle Maxwell, Ph.D.
About Jane Carlisle Maxwell, Ph.D.

Jane Carlisle Maxwell, Ph.D., is a Research Professor with the Addiction Research Institute at
the Steve Hicks School of Social Work, University of Texas at Austin. She has been a member of the SAMHSA, National Advisory Council, a consultant to the Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control, a Fulbright Senior Specialist, a member of the National Institute on Drug Abuse Community Epidemiology Work Group and NIDA’s National Drug Early Warning System. She has more than 45 years of experience monitoring changes in drug use patterns in Texas, in the U.S., and Internationally.

  • Q. University of Texas at Austin research shows that methamphetamines are still the largest driver of substance abuse issues in Texas.  With the explosion in opioid abuse in the United States, what do you see as the biggest issue facing Texas as we move forward?

    A. I definitely see methamphetamine as the #1 problem for Texas. If we look at the data in terms of epidemics, we see that these often are mini-epidemics or micro-epidemics that are caused by different types of a drug. The heroin epidemic is the best example. In Texas and across the south and southwest, the form of heroin is Mexican “black tar”, which is gummy life roofing tar. In the north, the heroin is a white powder from either Mexico or South American. With the white powder, dealers can premix the heroin with white fentanyl powder and sell a glassine envelop of the mix. But the mix can be very deadly because the user has little idea of how much fentanyl has been mixed in. Fentanyl test strips are being given out, along with naloxone, to prevent overdoses. A user in Texas is more likely to need to mix the gummy tar with fentanyl powder himself, which is not that easy and the user may not have access to the fentanyl.

    Part of the problem I have with conclusions about drug trends, is that people often do not understand the differences in the patterns of use, and we are hearing about opiate epidemics but the epidemics are only occurring in some states. But people do not look at the data and assume Texas is also in the middle of an opiate epidemic. And researchers working in some of the Appalachian area find users in one county are all using heroin and in the next county, it’s fentanyl, so the epidemics really can be micro in their nature.

    In order to really understand what is going on, I use a number of data sources: poison center calls, treatment admissions, mortality, results of toxicological analysis of items seized or on the street, reports from street outreach workers and workers in drug treatment programs, DEA trend data, etc.

  • Q. Are there specific programs underway to help to make substance abuse treatment affordable for all people of Texas? 

    A. Treatment services funded by the State through the Health and Human Services Commission are available without ability to pay. There are many programs which do charge for treatment, but those funded by HHSC do not.