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Drug & Alcohol Rehab Centers in Pennsylvania

Drug & Alcohol Rehab Centers in Pennsylvania

Simply put, drug and alcohol abuse in Pennsylvania is a major problem. In July of 2017, the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Philadelphia Division and the University of Pittsburgh released a joint intelligence report analyzing overdose deaths in Pennsylvania in 2016. The opening line of the report’s executive summary read: “The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is in the midst of an unprecedented epidemic of drug abuse and drug-related overdose deaths impacting every corner of the state and all of its residents.” That blunt assessment is, unfortunately, borne out by the report’s numerous distressing findings. Among them:

  • 4,642 drug-related overdose deaths were reported by Pennsylvania medical examiners and coroners in 2016, which averages out to about 13 deaths each day. That’s a shocking 37 percent increase in such deaths from the previous year.
  • The overdose death rate in the state in 2016 was 36.5 deaths per 100,000 people, a sharp increase from 26.7 per 100,000 in 2015. By comparison, the overdose death rate for the entire country in 2015 was 16.3 per 100,000. This puts Pennsylvania among those states with the highest overdose death rates.
  • The most frequently identified substances identified in decedents were: fentanyl and fentanyl-related substances (52 percent); heroin (45 percent); benzodiazepines (33 percent); cocaine (27 percent): and prescription opioids (25 percent).

And for those who still believe that substance abuse is predominantly a problem among inner-city minorities, consider this: when broken down by ethnicity, overdose deaths tracked almost exactly along total ethnic population lines in the state. And, surprisingly, percent increases in overdose deaths between 2015 and 2016 were larger in rural Pennsylvania counties (42 percent) than urban counties (34 percent.)

Source: Analysis of Overdose Deaths in Pennsylvania, 2016.

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Dennis Deal
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Simply put, drug and alcohol abuse in Pennsylvania is a major problem. In July of 2017, the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Philadelphia Division and the University of Pittsburgh released a joint intelligence report analyzing overdose deaths in Pennsylvania in 2016. The opening line of the report’s executive summary read: “The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is in the midst of an unprecedented epidemic of drug abuse and drug-related overdose deaths impacting every corner of the state and all of its residents.” That blunt assessment is, unfortunately, borne out by the report’s numerous distressing findings. Among them:

  • 4,642 drug-related overdose deaths were reported by Pennsylvania medical examiners and coroners in 2016, which averages out to about 13 deaths each day. That’s a shocking 37 percent increase in such deaths from the previous year.
  • The overdose death rate in the state in 2016 was 36.5 deaths per 100,000 people, a sharp increase from 26.7 per 100,000 in 2015. By comparison, the overdose death rate for the entire country in 2015 was 16.3 per 100,000. This puts Pennsylvania among those states with the highest overdose death rates.
  • The most frequently identified substances identified in decedents were: fentanyl and fentanyl-related substances (52 percent); heroin (45 percent); benzodiazepines (33 percent); cocaine (27 percent): and prescription opioids (25 percent).

And for those who still believe that substance abuse is predominantly a problem among inner-city minorities, consider this: when broken down by ethnicity, overdose deaths tracked almost exactly along total ethnic population lines in the state. And, surprisingly, percent increases in overdose deaths between 2015 and 2016 were larger in rural Pennsylvania counties (42 percent) than urban counties (34 percent.)

Source: Analysis of Overdose Deaths in Pennsylvania, 2016.

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Fast Facts: Addiction Initiatives & Rehabs in PA

On January 10, 2018, in recognition of the devastating and ever-growing opioid crisis in the Commonwealth, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf signed a statewide disaster declaration aimed at increasing access to treatment, enhancing the state’s response to the crisis, and saving lives. The declaration laid out 13 specific steps to be taken in furtherance of those aims. Major highlights include:

  • Establishing an Opioid Command Center at the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, which will house a coordination group to implement and monitor the progress of the initiatives put forward in the declaration.

  • Increasing access to Naloxone by: waiving regulations to allow pharmacists to partner with other organizations to make Naloxone available to at-risk persons upon their discharge from places like prisons and treatment programs; and enabling emergency medical services to leave behind Naloxone when responding to calls where the patients decline transportation to the hospital.

  • Waiving a number of regulations and expanding specific services in order to speed up and increase access to treatment.

By the Numbers: Pennsylvania Drug Rehabs

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) reports the following Pennsylvania addiction treatment stats:

Total Rehabilitation Facilities
Pennsylvania

510

Pittsburgh

48

Harrisburg

20

Philadelphia

139

Bethlehem

20

Scranton

11

Residential Rehab Programs
Pennsylvania

100

Pittsburgh

12

Harrisburg

4

Philadelphia

36

Bethlehem

4

Scranton

3

Outpatient Rehab Programs
Pennsylvania

392

Pittsburgh

38

Harrisburg

16

Philadelphia

105

Bethlehem

16

Scranton

10

Veterans Rehab Programs
Pennsylvania

89

Pittsburgh

6

Harrisburg

5

Philadelphia

30

Bethlehem

3

Scranton

4

Rehabs that Accept Medicare
Pennsylvania

123

Pittsburgh

10

Harrisburg

3

Philadelphia

48

Bethlehem

2

Scranton

1

Rehabs that Accept Medicaid
Pennsylvania

413

Pittsburgh

43

Harrisburg

16

Philadelphia

109

Bethlehem

12

Scranton

10

Rehabs that Accept Private Insurance
Pennsylvania

352

Pittsburgh

35

Harrisburg

14

Philadelphia

69

Bethlehem

14

Scranton

9

Top 10 Rehab Centers in Pennsylvania

Center City Recovery

ADDRESS:

1880 John F Kennedy Blvd., Suite 1110
Philadelphia, PA 19103

PHONE:

(215) 398-5304

Center City Recovery

Serving the greater Philadelphia area, Center City Recovery provides a range of outpatient evidence-based drug and alcohol rehabilitation services, including an intensive outpatient program, 12-step programs, intervention services, and mental illness/co-occurring disorder treatment. Sober living accommodations are also available. Center City employs and integrated behavioral health care model that addresses the patient’s physical, social, psychiatric, and spiritual well-being by combining medication and counseling with access to support services, such as education, job training, and housing. Center City Recovery accepts a variety of insurance plans and payment options, and offers sliding fee scale payment.

Allied Addiction Recovery

ADDRESS:

355 Fifth Ave., Suite 1419
Pittsburgh, PA 15222

PHONE:

(412) 246-8965

Allied Addiction Recovery

Locally owned and operated, Allied Addiction Recovery (AAR) offers outpatient drug and alcohol treatment services to individuals suffering with addiction issues in the Pittsburgh and greater Western Pennsylvania areas. Programs include intensive outpatient (IOP), partial hospitalization (PHP), individual and group therapy. Additionally, AAR is one of the few outpatient facilities to offer both medically assisted treatment (MAT) and drug-free treatment options. AAR also provides treatment for compulsive gambling. Payment is accepted from a wide range of private insurance providers and public sources, including Medicaid.

MARS-ATP

ADDRESS:

826 Delaware Ave.
Bethlehem, PA 18105

PHONE:

(610) 419-3101

MARS-ATP

The Mid-Atlantic Rehabilitation Services – Addiction Treatment Programs (MARS-ATP) offers client-centered, community-based traditional outpatient and intensive outpatient (IOP) programs on a cost-effective basis. IOP typically includes three group therapy sessions per week with an optional multi-family group on Saturday. The number of sessions may vary, however, based on the individual’s treatment needs. Patients in traditional outpatient programs attend one to two group and/or individual sessions per week. Most patients who complete IOP continue their recovery process in the traditional outpatient program.

Malvern, PA Inpatient Treatment Center

ADDRESS:

940 West King Road
Malvern, PA 19355

PHONE:

(610) 625-8376

Malvern, PA Inpatient Treatment Center

The Malvern Institute’s flagship location, the Malvern, PA Inpatient Treatment Center is located on eight acres in Chester County, approximately 27 miles outside of Philadelphia. Malvern offers 59 residential and 21 detox beds, and services that include medically-monitored detoxification, inpatient treatment, medication-assisted treatment (MAT), intervention services, and more. The Malvern Institute additionally offers inpatient residential services at its location in Willow Grove, PA, and outpatient services in Travose, Berwyn, Pottstown and Bethlehem, PA, and in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

The Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic at the University of Pennsylvania

ADDRESS:

3535 Market St., Suite 670
Philadelphia, PA 19104

PHONE:

(844) 573-3146

The Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic at the University of Pennsylvania

The Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic at the University of Pennsylvania (MFC) offers a wide range of behavioral health services, including substance abuse treatment, to military veterans and their families. No-cost treatment is available to all veterans, National Guard and Reserves included, regardless of role or discharge status. For the convenience of patients, MFC offers both early-morning and evening hours, as well as transportation assistance and telehealth options. Unless otherwise required by law, patient confidential information is not shared with the VA or other public, private, or government entities.

Recovering Adolescents and Families Together (R.A.F.T.)

ADDRESS:

860 Broad St., Suite 101
Emmaus, PA 18049

PHONE:

(610) 965-8454

Recovering Adolescents and Families Together (R.A.F.T.)

R.A.F.T. provides general outpatient services for the treatment of chemical dependency to adolescents, young adults, and adults residing in the Lehigh Valley. The staff at R.A.F.T. recognizes that the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual development of adolescents differs from that of adults, and employs specialized treatment modalities to meet those development needs. Programs include individual, group, and family therapy, as well as intensive outpatient (IOP) that meets three times per week. Private insurance and self-payment are accepted, and an income-based sliding fee scale is available.

The Gate House for Women

ADDRESS:

465 West Main St.
Mountville, PA

PHONE:

(717) 285-2300

The Gate House for Women

Located in Lancaster County, The Gate House for Women is a non-profit drug and alcohol treatment center providing residential, outpatient, and family treatment programs. The Gate House believes that its first responsibility is to “demonstrate compassion, empathy, and respect” towards its clients, and that every person is unique and must be treated as such. Residential programs are “community-based,” meaning that clients are integrated into the community with employment, life skills, housing options, and recovery support. Treatment programs are based on the 12-step recovery model, and incorporate other evidence-based practices, including “readiness to change” and motivational interviewing.

Cove Forge Behavioral Health

ADDRESS:

202 Cove Forge Road
Williamsburg, PA 16693

PHONE:

(877) 297-5107

Cove Forge Behavioral Health

Cove Forge Behavioral Health provides detox, residential, and outpatient services at its location in the countryside of Williamsburg. Treatment is available for a range of substances, including prescription drugs, alcohol, heroin, cocaine, meth, opioids, and marijuana. Of particular note is Cove Forge’s Heroin Opiate Positive Experience (H.O.P.E.) program, geared toward helping patients in the early stages of recovery from opioid dependence overcome the effects of a destabilized endorphin system. The H.O.P.E. program includes a wide range of specialized activities, such as a humor group that utilizes humor as a recovery too, brainwave entrainment, menus offering endorphin-enhanced foods, meditation, Bible study, and many others.

Interim House

ADDRESS:

333 West Upsal St.
Philadelphia, PA 19119

PHONE:

(215) 849-4606

Interim House

Financed through a number of state and local government sources, as well as private non-profit organizations, Interim House is a 501(c)(3) agency that provides comprehensive services to women with mental health and substance abuse issues from all neighborhoods and communities throughout Philadelphia. Programs include residential treatment, intensive outpatient, and outpatient counseling, as well as individual, group and family therapy, psychiatric evaluations, treatment for trauma survivors, job training and coaching, and much more. Incorporated in 1971, Interim House was one of the first specialized treatment programs for women in the nation.

Silvermist

ADDRESS:

130 Critchlow School Road
Renfrew, PA 16053

PHONE:

(724) 481-1284

Silvermist

Situated on 30 acres in rural western Pennsylvania approximately 45 miles north of Pittsburgh, Silvermist offers a variety of treatment services, including inpatient residential and partial hospitalization programs. Silvermist features a 1:4 clinician-to-client ratio, and accommodations limited to 19 adults. Luxury amenities include a heated swimming pool, large movie theater room, infrared sauna, billiards table, common recreation area with large TV, on-site fitness center, outdoor recreational activities, and a gourmet kitchen. Both private and semi-private rooms are available, some with fireplaces, oversized windows, and sitting nooks.

Paying for Drug Rehab Centers in PA

One of the biggest questions that anyone seeking help for a substance abuse problem has is, “How am I going to pay for treatment?” It’s an important question, too, because drug and alcohol rehab in Pennsylvania, as it is any other state, is expensive. Total cost depends on several factors, including the type of treatment (detoxification, inpatient residential, intensive outpatient, partial hospitalization, etc.), type of facility (standard care, luxury, etc.), length of treatment, substance or substances abused, and geographic location. And while the cost of a basic counseling program might start at as little as a few hundred dollars, in most cases treatment costs will run from a few thousand dollars (standard 30-day outpatient program) to tens of thousands of dollars per month (high-end inpatient residential program).

Fortunately, the actual amount that a patient will pay out of his or her own pocket is normally substantially less than the total costs of care mentioned here. The most common ways to pay for drug and alcohol rehabilitation in Pennsylvania include:

  • Private Insurance: Most private insurance plans today partially cover the costs of rehab in Pennsylvania. And, thanks to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), all Marketplace insurance plans must provide coverage for substance abuse treatment. The extent of coverage varies by state and plan, though, so be sure to review your policy carefully.
  • Public Insurance: Under the ACA, Medicaid is required to provide coverage for all basic aspects of substance abuse treatment, including detox, inpatient and outpatient services, medication, and more. Medicare may, in some cases, also cover costs associated with treatment.
  • Self-Pay: This can include, among other sources, moneys from credit cards, personal loans, home refinancing, and contributions from friends. And, of course, plain old cash. It’s likely that most individuals will need to come up with at least some funds themselves, even if they have insurance coverage.
  • Other options: Many Pennsylvania rehabilitation centers offer a sliding fee scale, which allows clients to pay what they can afford based on their income level and other relevant factors. Another option for low-income Pennsylvanians is treatment from a state-funded rehab center. More information on Pennsylvania rehab and treatment options can be found on the state’s official Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs website, which also provides this benefits navigator tool and county drug and alcohol office locater search engine.

Q&A With a Pennsylvania Drug Rehab Expert

About Dennis Deal, MHS LPC CCDP, Malvern Institute
About Dennis Deal, MHS LPC CCDP, Malvern Institute

Dennis Deal is the Chief Clinical Officer at the Malvern Institute in Pennsylvania. Mr. Deal has over 40 years experience in the field of the treatment of chemical dependency and related disorders. Prior to coming to the Malvern Institute, Dennis spent 39 years at Eagleville Hospital in the capacity of counselor/therapist, Clinical Supervisor and Clinical Director. In 2011, he became the Executive Director at Malvern, and was appointed Chief Clinical Officer there in July 2017.

Dennis is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and holds a Masters Degree in Human Services, as well as certifications in Addictions Counseling and as a Co-occurring Disorders Professional. Dennis has been a member of the Pennsylvania Certification Board since 2000.  

  • Q. What is currently going on in Pennsylvania in terms of substance use? What substances are you seeing? What are the trends?

    Most of our patients are heroin users, and that’s been going on for about 15 years. There are some patients who use other opiates, those being oxycodone, the immediate release form of that drug, and OxyContin, the time-release version of that drug. And then hydrocodone, to some extent. Many of those patients – not all of them, but many of them – move on to heroin because, unless they’re getting prescriptions from doctors, those drugs are very expensive on the street. So they find out that heroin is just as strong but a lot cheaper. That would not have even been a thought 15 years ago, 20 years ago. Nobody would even think that someone who didn’t come up using drugs from late adolescence would, in their late-20’s or mid-30’s, use heroin or put a needle in their arm. It is by no means a primary part of our population, but it is something that we see regularly. And we’ve seen that more in recent years than we ever did before.

  • Q. Can you quantify the types of substances you are seeing?

    I would say that 65 to 70 percent of the drug use we treat at Malvern is for opiates. And then next would be benzodiazepine, valium and xanax – the drugs in that family which, like alcohol, need a medically-managed detox. Some cocaine, probably about 10 percent. That used to be a lot more, but that’s kind of slowed. And we have a regular 20 percent straight alcohol.

  • Q. There’s been some indication that in some parts of the country doctors are starting to tighten up on their prescriptions of opioids. Are you seeing that where you are?

    I think that’s true.

  • Q. How about the use of heroin? What’s going on with that?

    There are two things. There’s white heroin and its strength, and the change we saw in that in the mid- to late-nineties. And then, more recently, there’s the cut of the heroin with fentanyl and why that’s happening.

    Fentanyl is stronger than heroin. For the last three or four years we thought [at first] that there were just people using this quality heroin and they didn’t know how to take their time with it, or that they had stopped for awhile and then went back to it and it was too much for them. And then we started hearing more and more from the police that [cutting with] fentanyl was becoming a regular occurrence. In fact, what we’re hearing now, and I can’t confirm this, that in some areas it’s just all fentanyl that they’re getting as heroin. So, that’s one of the biggest crazies of this whole thing. It’s all a roll of the dice, and that seems to be more real than it ever was with this whole fentanyl thing. It’s bad.

  • Q. Where do you think we are now in terms of treatment for all of these problems? Do you have any predictions?

    Predictions are dangerous, but I know what you’re asking. One of the things that feels different is that because of how strong this opiate is – the amount of opiates that the people we’re treating are using is so much more – I think that changes treatment. I think it takes a longer period of time for the brain to correct itself for normal functioning to occur.

    I’ll tell you what we do know. We know how to assess what people need. We don’t always have the ability to get them what they need. And that’s what I think we should be working towards, government-wise, for people who do what I do. I get that private insurance companies want to make profits. They’re businesses. But we have to have some way to fund what’s needed to stop this thing. Or to treat this thing. I’m not sure about the stopping it.