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Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers in Ohio

Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers in Ohio

Ohio has been called “Ground Zero” of the opioid epidemic. Hitting urban, suburban and rural areas alike, 23 deaths a week were attributed to heroin in 2016. The opioid fentanyl is showing the steepest rise in opioid-related deaths, according to the Ohio Department of Health (ODH), with a deadlier subset called carfentanil emerging and leading to more half of the 4,050 overdose deaths in Ohio in 2016. Overall, drug deaths were up 25% from 2015 to 2016.

Direct and indirect ramifications of the opioid epidemic are plentiful.  Ohio’s foster care systems has increased by 10 percent over a one year span from 2015 to 2016, according to reports, with number of children served soaring to 15,000. Emergency services and morgues are also being stretched beyond their means. A Montgomery County coroner whose morgue serves more than 30 counties, estimated last year that 60-70% of its bodies are the results of opioid overdoses.

Good news has surfaced, however. ODH also reported in 2016 a lowering of overdose deaths in relation to prescription opioids, marking the lowest rates in seven years.

“The continued increase in opioid-related deaths reaffirms that we still have much work to do, but Ohio is seeing important progress in reducing the number of prescription opioids available for abuse and prescription-related overdose deaths,” said Dr. Mark Hurst, medical director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and interim medical director of ODH. “This progress is significant because prescription opioid abuse is frequently a gateway to heroin and fentanyl use later on.”

For the fourth year, ODH reports opioid prescriptions declined in 2016, mirrored by a 78.2 percent decline over four years in “doctor shopping” for prescription opioids. These rates of improvement have been attributed to increased law enforcement efforts, opioid prescription guidelines and the use of Ohio Automated Rx, the state prescription drug monitoring system.

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Expert

Andrea Boxill
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Ohio has been called “Ground Zero” of the opioid epidemic. Hitting urban, suburban and rural areas alike, 23 deaths a week were attributed to heroin in 2016. The opioid fentanyl is showing the steepest rise in opioid-related deaths, according to the Ohio Department of Health (ODH), with a deadlier subset called carfentanil emerging and leading to more half of the 4,050 overdose deaths in Ohio in 2016. Overall, drug deaths were up 25% from 2015 to 2016.

Direct and indirect ramifications of the opioid epidemic are plentiful.  Ohio’s foster care systems has increased by 10 percent over a one year span from 2015 to 2016, according to reports, with number of children served soaring to 15,000. Emergency services and morgues are also being stretched beyond their means. A Montgomery County coroner whose morgue serves more than 30 counties, estimated last year that 60-70% of its bodies are the results of opioid overdoses.

Good news has surfaced, however. ODH also reported in 2016 a lowering of overdose deaths in relation to prescription opioids, marking the lowest rates in seven years.

“The continued increase in opioid-related deaths reaffirms that we still have much work to do, but Ohio is seeing important progress in reducing the number of prescription opioids available for abuse and prescription-related overdose deaths,” said Dr. Mark Hurst, medical director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and interim medical director of ODH. “This progress is significant because prescription opioid abuse is frequently a gateway to heroin and fentanyl use later on.”

For the fourth year, ODH reports opioid prescriptions declined in 2016, mirrored by a 78.2 percent decline over four years in “doctor shopping” for prescription opioids. These rates of improvement have been attributed to increased law enforcement efforts, opioid prescription guidelines and the use of Ohio Automated Rx, the state prescription drug monitoring system.

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Snapshot: Ohio Rehab Programs & Initiatives

The Ohio Opioid Technology Challenge has launched a competition to seek innovations in fighting abuse and addiction. The state spends $1 billion annually to fight the opioid epidemic and has earmarked $8 million of a $20 million commitment toward this contest to find new solutions to the state’s struggle with the drugs. “Whether you’re a medical or healthcare expert, or simply a concerned citizen, we are calling on everyone to be part of the solution,” said Director David Goodman, chair of the Ohio Third Frontier Commission.

“Take Charge Ohio: Manage Pain and Prevent Medication Abuse” is a public initiative spearheaded by The Ohio Department of Health with partner state agencies and boards. Targeted at the general public as well as medical professionals, its mission is to educate about safe prescription practices and treatment therapies that do not involve opioids, to “take charge” of safe pain management and avoid prescription drug abuse.

Maternal Opiate Medical Supports (MOMS) is a state program focusing on the health and wellness of mothers who struggle with opioid use and their children, both inside and outside of the womb. Ohio plans to spend more than $2 million over two years in to focus on improving health outcomes for these mothers and their infants through coordination of counseling, medication-assisted treatment, and case management services.

By the Numbers: Alcohol & Drug Rehab Centers in Ohio
Total Rehab Centers in Ohio

372

Long-term Rehab

64

Veteran Programs

46

Inpatient

18

Certified Opioid

19

Medicare

165

Outpatient

339

Transitional Housing

46

Medicaid

320

Short-term Rehab

40

Adolescent Programs

116

Private Insurance

272

By Metro
Cleveland

44

Cincinnati

58

Toledo

12

Columbus

42

Dayton

15

Top 10 Rehabs in Ohio

The following Ohio substance rehabilitation centers offer a wide range of treatment options and settings, ranging from flexible urban programs in larger metro markets to specialized treatment centers in more secluded settings.

The Ed Keating Center

ADDRESS:

2121 W. 117th Street
Cleveland, Ohio 44111

PHONE:

(216) 472-1276

The Ed Keating Center

Specializing in treating alcohol addiction, the Ed Keating Center offers a three-month inpatient rehab program facilitated by recovering alcoholics. Residents have sponsors and attend 12-step meetings every night. Once complete, clients move on to a “three-quarter” house program in which they work but are still part of the center’s supervised program. Daily 12-step meetings and weekly after-care meetings are mandatory. Residents then take part in a work release program in which they are still living in a structured, sober environment but they can work during the day and go to meetings in the evenings.

Ohio Addiction Recovery Center

ADDRESS:

727 E Main Street
Columbus, Ohio 43205

PHONE:

(800) 481-8457

Ohio Addiction Recovery Center

Offering intervention, detox and a full range of treatment options to meet individual needs, this rehab center is focused on the individual as well as the entire family. Specializing in both alcohol and drug abuse treatments, Ohio Addiction Recovery Center also offers a specialized program for men and their unique needs. Life skills, employment and the world after recovery is also a big focus of each individualized treatment plan.

Center for Addiction Treatment

ADDRESS:

830 Ezzard Charles Drive
Cincinnati, Ohio 45214

PHONE:

(513) 381-6672

Center for Addiction Treatment

Affordable, access to drug rehabilitation in Cincinnati since 1970, the Center for Addiction Treatment (CAT) offers both residential and intensive outpatient treatment with a focus on opiate dependent patients. Funded by United Way and the Hamilton County Mental Health and Recovery Services Board, CAT is accredited by the Joint Commission and Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services (MHAS).

Cleveland Clinic – Alcohol & Drug Recovery Center (ADRC)

ADDRESS:

1730 West 25th Street
Cleveland, Ohio 44113

PHONE:

(216) 363-2120

Cleveland Clinic – Alcohol & Drug Recovery Center (ADRC)

Part of the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Behavioral Health, the ADRC is a cutting-edge rehab center offering both inpatient and outpatient treatment. Clients learn to see their chemical dependency as a chronic condition, recognize trigger and symptoms, and understand the potentially dangerous and fatal outcomes of substance abuse disorders. Detoxification and rehabilitation services are available and supervised by an experienced medical staff. Therapeutic staff focus on emotional and social restoration, the 12-step program, relapse prevention skills and practical lifestyle change strategies.

California Palms Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers

ADDRESS:

1051 N Canfield Niles Road
Youngstown, Ohio 44515

PHONE:

(800) 378-8259

California Palms Veterans Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers

Offering various levels of treatment, California Palms offers various levels of evidence-based drug rehab treatment for veterans and active duty military at its Youngstown, Ohio campus. Specializing in substance abuse, drug addiction, opioid addiction, and alcohol addiction and co-occurring disorders such as PTSD, anxiety and depression, the luxury residential rehab facility offers various amenities and courtesy travel to and from the center.

Adolescent Substance Abuse Programs, Inc.

ADDRESS:

9403 Kenwood Rd. Ste. C-111
Cincinnati, Ohio 45242

PHONE:

(513) 792.1272

Adolescent Substance Abuse Programs, Inc.

Adolescent Substance Abuse Programs (ASAP) offer various outpatient alcohol
And drug rehab programs. The Total Recovery in Progress (TRIP) program includes drug screening and a mutual support group such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous, along with a strong family component. Once complete, young people are encouraged to attend Continuing Care meetings in a supportive, welcoming community. The CHOICES educational program is for teens who have experimented with alcohol or drugs but who have not been diagnosed with a substance abuse issue. All programs are designed to limit interference with regular school or other activities.

Hitchcock Center for Women, Inc.

ADDRESS:

1227 Ansel Road
Cleveland, Ohio 44108

PHONE:

(216) 421-0662

Hitchcock Center for Women, Inc.

“Where healing begins” is the motto and mission of the Hitchcock Center for Women which had its start as a halfway house in 1978 and expanded through the 1980s with the prevalence of crack cocaine. Serving women with both residential and outpatient care, HCFW also provides housing for women and their children up to age 12 and recovery management through aftercare services such as counseling, case management, vocational and life skills training.

CommQuest Regional Center for Opiate Recovery

ADDRESS:

1660 Nave Road SE
Massillon, Ohio 44646

PHONE:

(303) 837-9411

CommQuest Regional Center for Opiate Recovery

Part of the CommQuest not-for-profit agency which is certified by the Ohio Department of Mental Health, the Regional Center for Opiate Recovery is a detox facility on the Massillon campus. Serving residents of Northeast Ohio, the center offers both short-term inpatient and outpatient services while establishing a long-term continuum of recovery care.

Amethyst, Inc.

ADDRESS:

455 E. Mound Street
Columbus, Ohio 43215

PHONE:

(614) 242-1284

Amethyst, Inc.

The Amethyst program model focuses on addiction and emphasizing the roles that poverty and trauma play in perpetuating drug and alcohol use in women, Amethyst focuses on treating addictions no matter her background, financial capability or readiness for treatment. Intensive outpatient services while living in Amethyst supported housing is offered as well as the STAR outpatient program for women of all walks of life. The Recovery House enables women to transition back to independent living, while the family and child services portion of the program enables women to remain together with their children. These children receive drug and violence prevention and education and are coached on ways to resist and to communicate with peers and others. SummerQuest is a summer day camp for the children of women in treatment.

The Ridge Addiction Recovery Center

ADDRESS:

25 Whitney Drive, Suite 120
Milford, Ohio 45150

PHONE:

(513) 804-2204

The Ridge Addiction Recovery Center

Nestled 25 miles outside downtown Cincinnati, The Ridge offers luxury drug and alcohol rehabilitation in a quaint and private setting. The beautiful 51-acre estate offers many recreational opportunities outside of the physician designed and managed treatment program. Clients will enjoy healthy and nutritious meals created by two on-site chefs. Catering to executives and busy professionals, The Ridge has only 15 beds.

Paying for Inpatient Drug Rehab in Ohio

Paying for substance abuse treatment and rehabilitation is always a top priority. There are 320 facilities in the state that accept Medicaid, and Ohio maintains a toll free hotline if you have questions about applying and receiving services through Medicaid. The consumer hotline is (800) 324-8680.

Medicare is accepted at 165 drug rehab centers in Ohio. The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse publishes a guide to SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment on its website, offering guidance to obtain services and coverage under both Medicare and Medicaid.

In terms of opioid treatment, Ohio will be the recipient of close to $26 million in federal funding over two years as part of the 21st Century Cures Act. The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse is focusing the funding on prevention, medication-assisted treatment, SBIRT, recovery support, workforce development and first.

Ohio has created an action plan for local communities to face the opioid epidemic, in particular, The Action Guide to Address Opioid Abuse. Developed by a task force created by the governor, the guide draws on best practices and services in local communities that are funded by the state. Tools also include prevention programs, the addition of increased capacity for recovery housing and innovative models for connection Ohioans to treatment.

“We can give communities the tools, but we’re not going to defeat this just from the top down,” says Governor John R. Kasich in the action guide. “Problems that we have in this state have to be dealt with right in the neighborhood, right in the family and right in the community.”

The state has also created an Addiction Treatment Program that assists individuals in the court system to obtain substance abuse treatment in 22 counties in Ohio.

Q&A with Ohio Rehab Expert Andrea Boxill

About Andrea Boxill, Deputy Director of Ohio Governor’s Cabinet Opiate Action Team
About Andrea Boxill, Deputy Director of Ohio Governor’s Cabinet Opiate Action Team

Andrea Boxill is Deputy Director of the Governor’s Cabinet Opiate Action Team. She joined OhioMHAS in the summer of 2014 and brings a wealth of experience in leading Ohio’s efforts to fight opiate addiction. She previously served more than a decade as administrator of Franklin County Municipal Court’s specialty docket programs and as the Franklin County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board Mental Health Court coordinator. She holds a master’s degree in counseling and has significant experience in implementing mental health and addiction groups for both adults and adolescents, as well as extensive training in trauma-informed care and human trafficking.

  • Q. Opioid abuse appears to be the largest substance abuse issue in Ohio. Why has Ohio been hit so hard?

    I think Ohio has been impacted by the opioid epidemic just as other states across the country. The difference between being number one in unintentional opioid overdoses and being number five is very slight. I’m not certain that there is one cause or reason. Over prescribing, teenage access to unused medications, opportunities for drug trafficking by drug cartels and mafia; there are several factors that have culminated in a perfect storm.

  • Q. What do you see as the biggest issue related to substance abuse facing Ohio as we move forward?

    Education, awareness and prevention continue to be significant barriers when getting the entire population to acknowledge the severity, recognize that prevention is critical to a future epidemic, and to know the signs and symptoms of abuse and dependence to avoid death.

  • Q. Are there specific programs underway to help to make substance abuse treatment affordable for all people of Ohio?

    The expansion of medicaid has been critical and essential in helping connect people to treatment and recovery that otherwise would not have benefited. Additionally, our efforts to expand Medication Assisted Treatment, increase workforce development and fund innovative programs like drug courts and peer support programs helps in providing treatment in each community, rural, suburban and urban.

  • Q. The state of Ohio seems to be working on some innovative programs in relation to the opioid epidemic. How has your organization responded to the crisis?

    The Governor’s Cabinet Opiate Action Team, GCOAT, took the lead of Governor Kasich’s, “Start Talking!”, program and challenged each state department to determine how they would provide education to their staff and people they serve through their charter. i. e. The Ohio Office on Aging added a component on chronic pain management and proper storage and disposal of medication. After passing legislation to make Naloxone available over the counter for purchase, the Governor allocated $500,000 to go to local health departments to provide to first responders like law enforcement officers, who historically did not carry the lifesaving medication.

  • Q. What are you most hopeful about in tackling this issue?

    I’m hopeful that people will better understand the disease of addiction. That addiction is not a moral issue or character flaw but rather a disease that is stealth and lethal. Whether it is from prescribed medication or illicit drugs from the street, prevention and caution must be used at all times. I am also hopeful that people are gaining access to a variety of treatments that fit their need and that people do get healthy and have sustained sobriety.