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Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers in Illinois

Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers in Illinois

The story of Illinois is often one of two very different places: Chicago, the enormous urban metropolis in the Illinois’s northeast corner, and the predominantly rural rest of the state. The goals and interests – and cultures – of these two regions are very different in many ways, and sometimes in direct conflict with one another. But one serious issue unites all areas and residents of Illinois: the continuing devastating effects of drug addiction. As in practically all other parts of the country, the biggest concern currently is the opioid epidemic, but plenty of other substances – benzodiazepines, methamphetamine, cocaine, and alcohol, to name a few – continue to wreak havoc on the lives of individuals, and their families and friends, throughout the Prairie State. Here are a few distressing facts and figures on drug and alcohol use in Illinois:

  • From 2008 to 2017, opioid overdoses have killed nearly 11,000 people in Illinois. Nearly 1,900 died of opioid overdoses in 2016 alone. That’s almost twice the number killed in auto accidents. [Source: State of Illinois Opioid Action Plan, September 2017.]
  • Between 9,000 and 10,000 Illinois residents die annually from accidental injuries. Approximately 40 percent of those deaths are related to the use of alcohol. [Source: Illinois Department of Human Services.]
  • The annual economic costs statewide in Illinois associated with drug, alcohol, and tobacco-related mortality is estimated at $3.5 billion. [Source: Illinois Department of Human Services.]

Illinois state officials and others are fighting back, enacting legislation and funding new programs aimed at discouraging substance use, increasing access to treatment, and saving the lives of overdose victims. (More on this below.) Still, given the enormity of the problem – one that’s growing daily – much more needs to be done.

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Neli Vasquez Rowland
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The story of Illinois is often one of two very different places: Chicago, the enormous urban metropolis in the Illinois’s northeast corner, and the predominantly rural rest of the state. The goals and interests – and cultures – of these two regions are very different in many ways, and sometimes in direct conflict with one another. But one serious issue unites all areas and residents of Illinois: the continuing devastating effects of drug addiction. As in practically all other parts of the country, the biggest concern currently is the opioid epidemic, but plenty of other substances – benzodiazepines, methamphetamine, cocaine, and alcohol, to name a few – continue to wreak havoc on the lives of individuals, and their families and friends, throughout the Prairie State. Here are a few distressing facts and figures on drug and alcohol use in Illinois:

  • From 2008 to 2017, opioid overdoses have killed nearly 11,000 people in Illinois. Nearly 1,900 died of opioid overdoses in 2016 alone. That’s almost twice the number killed in auto accidents. [Source: State of Illinois Opioid Action Plan, September 2017.]
  • Between 9,000 and 10,000 Illinois residents die annually from accidental injuries. Approximately 40 percent of those deaths are related to the use of alcohol. [Source: Illinois Department of Human Services.]
  • The annual economic costs statewide in Illinois associated with drug, alcohol, and tobacco-related mortality is estimated at $3.5 billion. [Source: Illinois Department of Human Services.]

Illinois state officials and others are fighting back, enacting legislation and funding new programs aimed at discouraging substance use, increasing access to treatment, and saving the lives of overdose victims. (More on this below.) Still, given the enormity of the problem – one that’s growing daily – much more needs to be done.

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Snapshot: Why Rehab Centers in Illinois Matter

In September 2017, the State of Illinois presented its Opioid Action Plan, described as the state’s “call to action” in the fight against the opioid crisis. The plan’s goal is to reduce the projected number of opioid deaths in Illinois by 33% in 2020 by:

  • Prevention: Preventing the further spread of the opioid crisis.
  • Treatment and Recovery: Providing evidence-based treatment and recovery services to those suffering with opioid use disorder.
  • Response: Finding ways to avert overdose deaths.

Drug Addiction Hotline: On December 5, 2017, Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner announced the launch of a statewide telephone helpline, 1-833-2FINDHELP. The purpose of the hotline is to provide those struggling with addiction, and their families and friends, quicker, more convenient access to treatment options and other important resources.

Police departments in both Illinois and across the nation are joining the fight against the opioid crisis by implementing a new “police defection model”. The model helps individuals who voluntarily request treatment by pre-arranging services with appropriate treatment providers and, in some cases, providing transportation to treatment centers. As of September 2017, eleven departments in Illinois had active programs in place based on the deflection model. Contact information for those programs can be found here.

By the Numbers: Rehabilitation Centers of Illinois

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) reports the following Illinois addiction treatment stats:

Total Rehabilitation Facilities
Illinois

596

Chicago

188

Aurora

35

Rockford

13

Joliet

25

Naperville

49

Inpatient Rehab Programs
Illinois

95

Chicago

33

Aurora

4

Rockford

4

Joliet

5

Naperville

7

Outpatient Rehab Programs
Illinois

537

Chicago

161

Aurora

32

Rockford

11

Joliet

21

Naperville

45

Veterans Rehab Programs
Illinois

80

Chicago

30

Aurora

7

Rockford

2

Joliet

2

Naperville

7

Rehabs that Accept Medicare
Illinois

143

Chicago

49

Aurora

7

Rockford

4

Joliet

3

Naperville

10

Rehabs that Accept Medicaid
Illinois

305

Chicago

105

Aurora

12

Rockford

7

Joliet

8

Naperville

16

Rehabs that Accept Private Insurance
Illinois

398

Chicago

106

Aurora

28

Rockford

12

Joliet

15

Naperville

39

10 Top Alcohol and Rehab Centers in Illinois

The following are among some of the best addiction treatment centers in Illinois.

Banyan Treatment Center Chicago

ADDRESS:

50 South Main
Naperville, IL 60540

PHONE:

(630) 333-9912

Banyan Treatment Center Chicago

Located in Naperville and serving the greater Chicago metropolitan area, Banyan Treatment Center offers a number of outpatient-based drug and alcohol rehab services, including partial hospitalization (PHP), intensive outpatient (IOP), outpatient, and alumni programs. Based on the 12-step model and, alternatively, Smart Recovery, Banyan’s clinical approach to treatment is to, “address our patients’ substance use disorder alongside any co-occurring mental health disorders and life issues into an integrative, multi-disciplinary fashion.” Banyan Treatment Center additionally operates three Florida locations (Boca Raton, Stuart, and Pompano Beach), as well as centers in Wilmington, Massachusetts and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

KP Counseling

ADDRESS:

6392 Linden Rd.
Rockford, IL 61109

PHONE:

(779) 368-0060

KP Counseling

KP Counseling in Rockford provides a number of drug and alcohol addiction services, including substance abuse assessments, individual and group outpatient for adults and adolescents, and intensive outpatient treatment for patients 18 years of age and older. Treatment at KP is tailored to meet the unique needs of the individual patient, and may include individual, couples, group, and family counseling sessions. In addition to its substance abuse programs, KP offers mental health related treatment services for a variety of issues, including anxiety, depression, trauma, grief, ADHD, parent-child problems, and sex and gambling addictions.

Illinois Institute for Addiction Recovery

ADDRESS:

5409 N. Knoxville Ave.
Peoria, IL 61614

PHONE:

(309) 691-1055

Illinois Institute for Addiction Recovery

With facilities located at the Unity Point Proctor Hospital in Peoria, the Illinois Institute for Addiction Recovery (IIAR) offers treatment services to adults, adolescents, and families in the central Illinois area struggling with drug and alcohol abuse issues. Adult treatment services include early intervention, detoxification, outpatient, inpatient residential, and extended care programs. Treatment is tailored toward the individual and may include alternative therapies, such as yoga, massage, acupuncture, biofeedback, and others, to provide a more holistic approach to health and balance. Early intervention and outpatient programs are available to adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17. IIAR additionally operates treatment centers in Springfield, Normal, and Harvey.

A Safe Haven

ADDRESS:

2750 West Roosevelt Rd.
Chicago, IL 60608

PHONE:

(773) 435-8300

A Safe Haven

Since its establishment in 1994, A Safe Haven (ASH) has served over 100,000 clients, and provides a wide range of services daily to over 1,200 individuals in social and economic crisis. Services offered include food, shelter, behavioral health treatment, education, job training, and access to employment and affordable housing. Substance abuse services include individual and group recovery education, meetings, counseling and other programs based on a 12-step model. Working in partnership with public, private, and corporate foundations, ASH is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization that is a hybrid not-for-profit/for-profit social business enterprise aimed at breaking the cycle of poverty and homelessness in its community.

Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital

ADDRESS:

5000 South 5th Ave.
Hines, IL 60141

PHONE:

(708) 202-8387

Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital

The Edward Hines, Jr. Veterans Hospital, located 12 miles west of downtown Chicago, provides comprehensive treatment services to veterans suffering from drug and alcohol issues through its Substance Abuse Disorder (SUD) Program. Central to these services is the Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Program (SARRTP). Intensive outpatient, standard outpatient, and opioid treatment programs are also available. The VA additionally offers SUD Program services at four other locations in Illinois: the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center in North Chicago; the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center in Chicago; the Marion VA Medical Center in Marion; and the VA Illiana Health Care System in Danville.

F.A.I.R. Counseling

ADDRESS:

2010 East Algonquin Rd.
Schaumburg, IL 60173

PHONE:

(847) 359-5192

F.A.I.R. Counseling

Located just northwest of Chicago in Schaumburg, Families and Adolescents in Recovery, Inc. (F.A.I.R.) is a comprehensive, evidence-based provider of drug and alcohol abuse and addiction treatment for adolescents, young adults, and their families. F.A.I.R. offers intensive outpatient programs, continuing care, and family therapy based on neuroscience and evidence-based treatment interventions. Treatment focuses on client and family strengths to address issues of substance abuse, mental health, and destructive behaviors. Modalities include a combination of cognitive behavioral and multidimensional family therapies, and incorporate the community model and participation in 12-step programs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous.

The Women's Treatment Center

ADDRESS:

140 North Ashland Ave.
Chicago, IL 60607

PHONE:

(312) 850-0050

The Women's Treatment Center

The Women’s Treatment Center (TWTC), in the Near West Side neighborhood of Chicago, is a 501(c)(3) facility that provides comprehensive, family-based treatment exclusively to women battling drug addiction. TWTC’s range of services includes: medically-monitored detoxification in its 16-bed unit; residential treatment; outpatient treatment for those who have completed the residential program or require a less structured environment; and transitional living for those who have completed residential treatment. Admission priority is given to pregnant IV drug users, followed by other pregnant substance users, other injecting drug users, and then all others. Under certain conditions, TWTC provides treatment to women with up to three children under the age of six.

Brightside Clinic

ADDRESS:

333 Skokie Blvd., Suite 112
Northbrook, IL 60062

PHONE:

(224) 205-7866

Brightside Clinic

Brightside Clinic is an outpatient treatment center that specializes in services for those suffering from pain medication dependency and heroin addiction. Brightside develops a recovery plan around each client’s current addiction or alternative treatment, life goals, and special needs such as pain management, pregnancy, or pre-surgery requirements. Plans combine medically-assisted treatment (Suboxone, Subutex, Bunavail, Zubsolv) with private and group counseling. Brightside’s mission is encapsulated in its PACT Promise: Programs that work; access to treatment; comfortable transition; and treatment designed for you. Brightside operates additional locations in Tinley Park and North Aurora.

Breaking Free

ADDRESS:

120 Gale St.
Aurora, IL 60506

PHONE:

(630) 897-1003

Breaking Free

In operation for over 40 years, Breaking Free is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation providing a range of important services to residents of Kane, DuPage, Grundy, Kendall, and Will Counties, including drug, alcohol, and co-occurring disorders treatment for both adults and adolescents. Programs offered include comprehensive assessments, outpatient and intensive outpatient programs (including programs specifically for women), as well as continuing care and support services. Family, parenting and child abuse services are also available. Fees are determined on a sliding scale, and all persons in need are served regardless of ability to pay.

Sunspire Health Heartland

ADDRESS:

1237 East 1600 North Rd.
Gilman, IL 60938

PHONE:

(815) 865-3282

Sunspire Health Heartland

Situated on 33 rural acres approximately 90 miles south of Chicago in eastern Illinois, Sunspire Health Heartland offers individualized, evidence-based comprehensive treatment for addiction and co-occurring mental health disorders. Services include on-site medical detox, 36-bed inpatient residential, and partial hospitalization (PHP). Sunspire believes that families play an integral role in the treatment process, and incorporates weekly family therapy sessions (in-person or by telephone) into the treatment process. Center amenities include an onsite 3-acre pond, walking paths, therapeutic community garden, and a fully-equipped gym. Payment is accepted from a variety of private health insurance providers. Sunspire Health operates seven additional facilities throughout the U.S.

Paying for Rehabilitation Centers in Illinois

The expense of treatment at an Illinois rehabilitation center is a major concern regardless of the substance at issue or the type and level of treatment sought. Fortunately, most Illinois rehabs will work with patients to access a combination of payment sources to cover treatment costs. Among the most common sources of payment are:

  • Private Insurance: Due mainly to the Affordable Care Act, most private and all public insurance plans carry some level of coverage for substance abuse treatment. Specific types of treatment covered and other limitations vary by plan, so be sure to check the language in your policy carefully.
  • Public Insurance: Individuals with Medicaid are eligible to receive payment benefits for a number of important rehab services, such as detoxification, medication, and residential and outpatient treatment. Medicare recipients may be eligible for certain substance abuse treatment payment benefits as well.
  • Self-Pay: Most persons seeking rehab in Illinois will be responsible for paying at least a portion of their treatment costs out of their own pockets. Typical sources of self-pay funds include credit cards, personal loans, friends and family contributions, and personal bank accounts.
  • Access to Recovery: Access to Recovery, or ATR, is a federally-funded program that provides qualifying low-income individuals access to drug and alcohol programs from traditional clinical treatment services, as well as certain alternative recovery support services. Eligible persons are able to choose from among ATR-approved programs that meet their service needs and program priorities. More information on ATR in Illinois, including eligibility requirements, can be found here.
  • Other options: Many drug rehab centers in Illinois offer sliding fee scales and/or scholarships and grants to qualifying clients to help make treatment more affordable. Contact rehab centers directly for information on availability.

Q&A with Illinois Addictions Expert Neli Vasquez Rowland

About Neli Vasquez Rowland, President/Co-founder, A Safe Haven
About Neli Vasquez Rowland, President/Co-founder, A Safe Haven

Neli Vasquez-Rowland is the Co-Founder & President of A Safe Haven Foundation (ASHF), a vertically-integrated ecosystem that supports social service delivery along with social business enterprises to create a sustainable environment that fosters positive change in the lives of homeless individuals. Neli is a graduate of Loyola University’s School of Business, and the Minority Executive Management program at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business. 

  • Can you tell us a little bit about A Safe Haven and what you do?

    We provide housing and a full range of wraparound services, comprehensive services. Each individual that comes in gets assessed, not just for any behavioral healthcare challenges, but also any co-existing issues that may be presenting, such as employment, family issues, as well as health and nutrition. Then we plug them into treatment services, training services, education services, job placement, and permanent housing. A Safe Haven provides services for 5000 people a year. We don’t charge anyone for our services, everything is fully covered by our funding stream – which is government, donations by foundations, and our ability to earn revenue from our businesses. Today, we are considered a national model that is literally connecting the dots for people that are in crisis for whatever reasons – in crisis for a day or for decades.

  • What do you do specifically in terms of substance abuse treatment?

    Individual services, group therapy, following the 12-step model. We have psychologists onsite as well.

  • What substances are you dealing with the most at A Safe Haven?

    A lot of heroin. And the biggest gateway drug for a lot of people that we serve has been the painkillers. That’s been common knowledge for at least the past five to seven years. Now that the death rates have exceeded every other disease that we’ve seen in the last few decades, it’s getting the attention that it deserves. I want to say that over the last 10 years, about 80 percent of the people that end up using heroin started out using painkillers.

  • What about other substances beyond heroin and prescription painkillers?

    Alcohol is always a big one. I would say that heroin and alcohol are two of the leading problems that we’re having.

  • Is there anything being done to combat these drug and alcohol problems in Illinois?

    You started out this conversation saying that you wanted to talk to someone who is working on the front lines, and we’ve been working on the front lines for 24 years. Fortunately, task forces are being put together across the country, including here in Chicago and in Illinois. These task forces are not engaging front-line organizations, though. They’re mostly engaging the hospital community, the medical community, the pharmaceutical community. I think that we must expand the conversation to include those of us that are working on this from our [community-based programming] perspective as well.

    The goal out there right now is to literally stop people from dying. If the goal is to stop people from dying, then I believe we’re going to make some progress. But what we’re not going to do is solve the underlying issues of some of the co-existing conditions that are presenting, such as other behavioral healthcare issues that may be involved, as well as economic issues and housing challenges.

  • Any other suggestions on what can be to support treatment centers in Illinois and their clients?

    My advice to government agencies, and basically the public at-large, is that they really need to think about policies that are going to help people, not only short-term, but long-term. And really allocating our resources where we’re going to make the biggest return on our investment. I believe that once we come to terms with that, we’re going to see a paradigm shift.