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Find Heroin Treatment Centers Near You

If you or a loved one is suffering from a heroin addiction, the most important first steps in recovery are acceptance and seeking initial treatment in a heroin rehabilitation center. It can be overwhelming because there are a wide variety of heroin rehabs in terms of treatment options, costs, and steps in the process. Research and planning are keys in finding the best path forward, and timing is equally important so that you are armed with as much information as needed once the recovery initiates.

Expert

Brent McCraw
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If you or a loved one is suffering from a heroin addiction, the most important first steps in recovery are acceptance and seeking initial treatment in a heroin rehabilitation center. It can be overwhelming because there are a wide variety of heroin rehabs in terms of treatment options, costs, and steps in the process. Research and planning are keys in finding the best path forward, and timing is equally important so that you are armed with as much information as needed once the recovery initiates.

Signs Someone May Need a Heroin Rehabilitation Center

Heroin is a highly addictive substance, and highly destructive. That is why it is critical for addicts to seek heroin detox centers as soon as possible. The following signs suggest you or someone you love may be addicted to heroin:

  • Needle marks or bruising
  • Constricted pupils
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Sudden mood changes
  • A sense of euphoria
  • Dry mouth
  • Disorientation
  • Secretive behavior
  • Alternating periods of sudden hyperactivity and fatigue

How Heroin Treatment Centers Help

Heroin rehabs aim to break one’s addiction and teach them how to manage it long-term. Among their goals:

  • Heroin detoxification
  • Conducting a comprehensive assessment of heroin user's mental and physical condition
  • Creating an individualized treatment plan
  • Using various tools and treatment methods to break one’s heroin addiction
  • Addressing heroin addiction triggers, such as strained relationships, homelessness or job loss
  • Diagnosing coexisting conditions that may drive heroin addiction, such as depression or PTSD
  • Rebuilding relationships and establishing a social support network
  • Providing tools one can use for long-term addiction management
  • Directing patients to post-treatment recovery support programs like Narcotics Anonymous
  • Providing a safe touchstone for patients struggling with relapse

How Heroin Rehab Centers Work

All rehab centers share a common process: detoxification, treatment, and recovery support. Heroin rehabs use a number of tools to help patients recover from drug addiction. The following are among them

  • Medications Used in Heroin Detox Centers
  • Behavioral Therapies Heroin Rehabilitation Centers Use
  • Pharmacological treatments for heroin and other opioid addictions operate very similarly to the addictive drug they are combatting, but without the dangerous side effects. These medications include agonists, partial agonists and antagonists which either activate or block opioid receptors in the brain.

    Medications used in heroin rehabilitation centers can have an ancillary benefit as a person is first stopping his or her heroin use and beginning the detoxification process. Withdrawal can be intense and painful, including severe nausea, diarrhea and vomiting, but medication can often ease these symptoms and limit the heroin craving. This is helpful in preventing relapse.

    Methadone

    Methadone limits withdrawal symptoms and does not cause a “high.” It is a slow-acting agonist that has been effectively used to treat heroin addiction for more than fifty years, especially with patients who don’t respond well to other pharmacological options. You should not use methadone if you have severe asthma or breathing problems, or an intestinal obstruction called paralytic ileus. Methadone can only be dispensed by certified pharmacies and should be strictly used as prescribed. It can inhibit breathing when the medication is started or if the dose is changed. Methadone can also cause heart rhythm disorders that can be life threatening. Doctors should be made aware of any history of heart disease or disorders, electrolyte imbalances, breathing problems, head injuries, migraine headaches, depression and use of any sedatives or other medications.

    Buprenorphine

    Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist used by many heroin rehabs. Buprenorphine relieves drug cravings without producing the “high” or dangerous side effects of other opioids. The drug may be taken orally or by injection, depending on the variation. This medication can be taken outside a treatment clinic, therefore increasing access for those in need.

    Naltrexone

    Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist used in some heroin treatment centers. As it blocks opioids, it is not addictive and it doesn’t sedate. Vivitrol is a variation of this medication that is injectable and long-acting, therefore it is not necessary to use daily and easier for patients to comply with, therefore increasing the effectiveness.

  • There is a magnitude of evidence that the combination of psycho-social with medication-assisted treatment is best course of treatment for those with a heroin addiction. Effective behavioral treatments administered in include inpatient, residential and outpatient centers:

    Contingency Management

    may also be referred to a Voucher-Based Reinforcement works on an incentive basis to reward positive behavior and abstinence. When a heroine-free urine screening is produced, the patient receives a voucher that may be exchanged for various rewards.

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    Cognitive behavioral therapy can be very effective especially when used in concert with pharmacological treatments. The purpose is to help modify behavior and expectations in relation to stressors that lead to the heroin use initially.

Interview With a Heroin Addictions Expert: How to Choose Heroin Treatment Centers

The dangers of heroin addiction call for immediate treatment that includes supervised detoxification. Not all heroin rehabilitation centers are the same, however. They may follow different timelines or use different treatment approaches. We asked Brent McCraw, M.Ed., Director of Addiction & Recovery Services at Centra’s Pathways program in Lynchburg, Virginia, how to go about choosing heroin treatment centers.

“It’s very difficult” to choose the right heroin rehabilitation center, says McCraw. “There are a lot of treatment centers. How do you decide what is good place and what is not?”

McCraw says it’s best to interview various programs. Often people go online and find places, but if you are fortunate enough to be near a treatment center, go and see it, ask for a meeting with the admissions person, and go and meet staff.

“Good treatment centers will offer a free assessment,” adds McCraw. “Those centers will try and do a clinical assessment to assess the right care. Observe how responsive and how friendly the facility is. How is your first phone meeting? How many beds does the facility have? …You want it to be good fit. You want to feel that it is a good match.”

Treatment for an addiction disease is not cheap. In Virginia alone, McCraw estimates residential treatment can range from $10-30,000 a month. That is private pay with no insurance, Centra’s Pathways program being on the lower end.

“As you are interviewing treatment centers, getting estimates on costs is important just as a reference,” says McCraw. “Insurance is complicated, but we do what we can over the phone from the initial consultation to find out if there is a benefit, is substance abuse covered, and then we help patients and families verify different levels of care covered.”

McCraw says Pathways and other programs will do what they can to verify benefits prior to admission. Once there is a decision to admit, most programs will try and pick level a care that a patient will qualify for and will advocate to get those days qualified.

“We have a motel model,” explains McCraw. “Maybe you qualify for outpatient, but still need residential. We will try to patch things together to get you the level of care needed. Places like Pathways and other treatment centers will be helpful in exploring options like this.”