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Cocaine Rehab Centers

Cocaine Rehab Centers

Cocaine—also known as coke, blow, charlie, powder, and snow—is a highly-addictive stimulant and one of the most commonly abused drugs in the United States. In fact, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, in 2014, there were 1.5 million active cocaine users around the country—some as young as 12 years old.

Made from the coca plant of South America, cocaine can be injected, snorted, or smoked by users. No matter how people choose to ingest the drug, cocaine abuse can have devastating short- and long-term effects on their health—from nasal damage to erratic behavior to extreme weight loss to death. In addition, if someone is pregnant while abusing cocaine, their child may be born with a host of health challenges including low birth weight and neonatal abstinence syndrome.

Those who are addicted to cocaine need effective cocaine rehab in order to get sober. This page discusses cocaine treatment, as well as what the detox and withdrawal processes are like.

Expert

Ruby B. Johnson
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Cocaine—also known as coke, blow, charlie, powder, and snow—is a highly-addictive stimulant and one of the most commonly abused drugs in the United States. In fact, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, in 2014, there were 1.5 million active cocaine users around the country—some as young as 12 years old.

Made from the coca plant of South America, cocaine can be injected, snorted, or smoked by users. No matter how people choose to ingest the drug, cocaine abuse can have devastating short- and long-term effects on their health—from nasal damage to erratic behavior to extreme weight loss to death. In addition, if someone is pregnant while abusing cocaine, their child may be born with a host of health challenges including low birth weight and neonatal abstinence syndrome.

Those who are addicted to cocaine need effective cocaine rehab in order to get sober. This page discusses cocaine treatment, as well as what the detox and withdrawal processes are like.

Fast Facts: Cocaine Addiction in America

Between 2014 and 2015, the states that had the most cocaine use among 18 to 25 year olds were:

  • New Hampshire
  • Vermont
  • Colorado
  • Rhode Island
  • Connecticut
  • Massachusetts
  • Arizona
  • Oregon
  • Maine
  • Delaware

(Source:Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)

The most effective treatment for cocaine addiction combines pharmacological and behavioral interventions.(Source:National Institute on Drug Abuse)

Most patients who seek treatment for cocaine addiction are crack users.(Source:National Institute on Drug Abuse)

In 2014, 12.4 percent, or 5,856, of overdose deaths were caused by cocaine. (Source:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

In 2015, there were 6,784 cocaine-related deaths around the country. Of these fatalities, 1,899 were female and 4,885 were male. (Source:National Institute on Drug Abuse)

When people getting rehabilitation for cocaine are given cognitive behavioral therapy, they are more likely to achieve long-term abstinence from the drug.(Source:National Institute on Drug Abuse)

After completing cocaine rehab, those who participate in aftercare programs are more likely to abstain from using the drug.(Source:National Institute on Drug Abuse)

Short-term effects of cocaine use include nausea, irregular heartbeat, paranoia, and irritability. People who use the drug on a long-term basis may experience nosebleeds, restlessness, auditory hallucinations, and severe bowel decay.(Source:National Institute on Drug Abuse)

Find a Cocaine Rehabilitation Center

If you or someone you know is addicted to cocaine, it is important to get help immediate to prevent overdose (or worse). The most effective cocaine rehabs combine detox, which is designed to get cocaine out of their system, with behavioral counseling that teaches them the lifestyle changes that need to be made in order to prevent a relapse.

What to Expect in a Cocaine Treatment Center

While programs do vary, the process of rehabilitation for cocaine tends to follow the same steps in the same order.

What to Do if Someone is Overdosing on Cocaine

Death by overdose is the most serious risk of cocaine addiction. If you believe someone you know and love is experiencing an overdose, do the following before reporting to a cocaine rehabilitation center:

  • 1. Know the Signs of a Cocaine Overdose
  • 2. Seek Immediate Medical Care
  • 3. What to do While Waiting for Help
    • Elevated heart rate
    • Chest pain
    • Panic attacks
    • Nausea
    • Elevated body temperature
    • Sweating
    • Erratic behavior
    • Delusions
    • Seizures
    • Hyperthermia
    • Shock
    • Chills
    • Vomiting
    • Tremors
    • Stroke
  • When someone is overdosing on cocaine, time is of the essence for treatment. Every minute counts in terms of preventing stroke, heart attack, permanent injuries, and death. As a result, when first responders arrive to treat someone having a cocaine overdose, they are tasked with restoring blood flow to the heart and oxygen to the brain, as well as stopping any seizures that may be occurring.

    • Apply a cold compress to their body to prevent their temperature from getting dangerously elevated.
    • Remove clothing that can restrict breathing, like scarves.
    • Move sharp and hard objects from the area that can cause injury, especially if the person is having a seizure.
    • Stay with the person until help arrives and tell emergency responders what drugs were taken.

Q&A With Cocaine Rehab Expert

About Ruby B. Johnson, LCSW, LCDC
About Ruby B. Johnson, LCSW, LCDC

Ruby B. Johnson, has been a clinical practitioner since 2003. Since 2003, Mrs. Johnson has been an adjunct professor, community educator, and advocate. Her areas of practice are substance use disorders, obsessive-compulsive sexual behaviors, and attachment disorders. She owns Inamorata LLC (www.inamorata.me) and Johnson Conflict Resolution (www.johnsonconflictresolution.com), and is the CEO and organizer for PolyDallas Millennium© LLC (www.polydallasmillennium.com).

  • Q. How is cocaine addiction different from addiction to other drugs?

    All addictions whether chemical or non-chemical have three criteria: loss of control, compulsive use, and continued using despite the adverse consequences.

    Addiction’s impact on the brain is very similar regardless if it’s chemical or non-chemical. There are two regions of the brain to consider. One is the executive functioning (determining right or wrong, weighing consequences, cost-benefit analysis, etc.). Dependence and craving take part in the primitive region, amygdala and reptilian brain. The disruption to the brain’s functioning create the same loss of control, compulsive use, and use despite adverse consequences.

    Cocaine is ingested by smoking, intravenously, or inhaling. Smoking cocaine, freebasing or crack, has been depicted in media and film as the ultimate dereliction. They are called “crack heads.” Intravenous substance users are viewed as junkies.

    A significant difference is how the individuals who are addicted to cocaine are viewed.

  • Q. How is rehabilitation for cocaine different from that other substances? What are the most effective treatment cocaine treatment centers use?

    Baseline treatment for substance users is talk therapy, support groups, and medication treatment of the mood and physical symptoms. The most effective treatment modality is motivational interviewing. Motivational interviewing allows the person to determine what is going to be the best action for them to reach their goals and what is needed to maintain the change.

    Addiction is a family disease. An often missed aspect of treatment is the family getting healthy along with the person who is the addict.

  • Q. What can someone do to stay clean after completing after attending a cocaine treatment center?

    Here are a few suggestions:

    • Stay away from people, places, and things from using times
    • Establish social connections and support that are drug free
    • Get involved with a twelve-step program or other support group
    • Maintain a schedule that is active and purposeful
    • Develop a regimen that includes healthy eating, good sleep hygiene, and exercise
    • Stay compliant with medication and doctor appointments

    All of these suggestions encourage the person to maintain decreased idol time, healthy goals, and engagement with people who are supportive.

  • Q. How can family and friends help someone addicted to cocaine?

    Don’t enable the addict. Families want to protect the addict from discomfort or consequences. This is not the family’s role. Also, the family needs to seek their therapy and support group.