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Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers in California

Drug & Alcohol Treatment Centers in California

California remains the ultimate destination for vacationers from throughout the United States, but its deep water ports, busy borders, numerous urban centers, and extensive transportation facilities also make it a major destination for drug traffickers feeding a formidable substance abuse problem for its residents. The importance of California rehabilitation centers cannot be overstated.

The state has not been immune to the ravages of the opioid epidemic. For almost two decades, the opioid crisis wave has made its way across the country, hitting the West Coast with particular strength and overtaking methamphetamine as the major substance threat to California’s population. The state’s relatively low opioid death rates are of little comfort to those individuals struggling with an addiction to prescription painkillers or heroin.

Besides opioids and methamphetamine, other drugs commonly abused by Californians include cocaine, benzodiazepines and other tranquilizers and sedatives, club drugs like ecstasy, ketamine and GHB, and – of course – alcohol and marijuana.

Below are a few distressing facts and figures that illustrate California’s continuing fight against drug abuse:

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of drug-related overdose deaths in California in 2016 was 4,654, or 11.2 deaths per 100,000 persons. That rate has been relatively stable with only marginal changes over the last few years. In fact, there’s actually been a very slight drop in overdose death rates in the state from 2015 to 2016.
  • Notwithstanding the slight drop in overdose rates, drug abuse among California residents is, without question, a very serious problem. Consider the following: the same CDC report cited above indicates that the number of drug overdoses in California reached an all-time high in 2014.
  • As reported by the Sacramento Bee in September 2017, opioid use is a decidedly regional problem in California, with prescription drug use and deaths in rural and semi-rural parts of the state far outpacing state averages. In fact, five mostly rural counties in California – Del Norte, Lake, Shasta, Tuolumne, and Trinity – had more opioid prescriptions than residents.
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Haley Boggs
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California remains the ultimate destination for vacationers from throughout the United States, but its deep water ports, busy borders, numerous urban centers, and extensive transportation facilities also make it a major destination for drug traffickers feeding a formidable substance abuse problem for its residents. The importance of California rehabilitation centers cannot be overstated.

The state has not been immune to the ravages of the opioid epidemic. For almost two decades, the opioid crisis wave has made its way across the country, hitting the West Coast with particular strength and overtaking methamphetamine as the major substance threat to California’s population. The state’s relatively low opioid death rates are of little comfort to those individuals struggling with an addiction to prescription painkillers or heroin.

Besides opioids and methamphetamine, other drugs commonly abused by Californians include cocaine, benzodiazepines and other tranquilizers and sedatives, club drugs like ecstasy, ketamine and GHB, and – of course – alcohol and marijuana.

Below are a few distressing facts and figures that illustrate California’s continuing fight against drug abuse:

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of drug-related overdose deaths in California in 2016 was 4,654, or 11.2 deaths per 100,000 persons. That rate has been relatively stable with only marginal changes over the last few years. In fact, there’s actually been a very slight drop in overdose death rates in the state from 2015 to 2016.
  • Notwithstanding the slight drop in overdose rates, drug abuse among California residents is, without question, a very serious problem. Consider the following: the same CDC report cited above indicates that the number of drug overdoses in California reached an all-time high in 2014.
  • As reported by the Sacramento Bee in September 2017, opioid use is a decidedly regional problem in California, with prescription drug use and deaths in rural and semi-rural parts of the state far outpacing state averages. In fact, five mostly rural counties in California – Del Norte, Lake, Shasta, Tuolumne, and Trinity – had more opioid prescriptions than residents.

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Snapshot: California Rehab and Addiction

CURES: Under the state’s Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System (CURES), all pharmacists practicing in California are required to report all drugs they dispense to the CURES searchable database. The purpose of the database is to provide prescribers with a way to check prior prescriptions to patients and stop them from script shopping. Currently, however, neither pharmacists nor physicians are required by law to check the database before dispensing drugs or writing new prescriptions.

Drug Medi-Cal: Drug Medi-Cal, the state’s agency for providing substance abuse treatment services to qualifying low-income citizens, is revamping its treatment system to provide more and better services to patients. New benefits will go beyond the current network of outpatient and narcotic treatment programs to include detoxification services, residential care, medically assisted treatment, and more.

MAT Expansion: In April of 2017, the Department of Human Services announced $90 in funding for the California Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) Expansion Project, whose purpose is to provide services to over 20,000 persons with Opioid Use Disorders. The project focuses on statewide access to buprenorphine and on populations within the state currently with limited MAT access.

By the Numbers: Alcohol and Drug Rehab Centers in California

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) reports the following California rehabilitation center stats:

Total California Rehab Facilities
California

1117

Los Angeles

164

San Francisco

84

San Diego

58

Riverside

42

San Jose

25

Inpatient Rehab Programs
California

409

Los Angeles

52

San Francisco

33

San Diego

23

Riverside

18

San Jose

9

Outpatient Rehab Programs
California

797

Los Angeles

123

San Francisco

54

San Diego

38

Riverside

29

San Jose

18

Veterans Rehab Programs
California

257

Los Angeles

41

San Francisco

20

San Diego

22

Riverside

12

San Jose

3

Rehabs that Accept Medicare
California

187

Los Angeles

25

San Francisco

15

San Diego

12

Riverside

10

San Jose

6

Rehabs that Accept Medicaid
California

345

Los Angeles

53

San Francisco

27

San Diego

21

Riverside

14

San Jose

5

Rehabs that Accept Private Insurance
California

595

Los Angeles

83

San Francisco

31

San Diego

21

Riverside

24

San Jose

12

10 Rehabilitation Centers in California

The Hills Treatment Center

ADDRESS:

8207 Mulholland Dr.
Los Angeles, CA 90046

PHONE:

(866) 323-4665

The Hills Treatment Center

Located in the Hollywood Hills, The Hills Treatment Center offers a comprehensive level of substance abuse rehabilitation services, including drug and alcohol detox, residential treatment, partial hospitalization (PHP), intensive outpatient (IOP) and aftercare programs. Specialized options include separate men’s, women’s, and teen programs, executive rehab, family therapy and family immersion programs, pet therapy, and more. In addition to its main facility, The Hills operates two sober living locations in the Los Angeles area.

Ohlhoff Recovery Programs

ADDRESS:

601 Steiner St.
San Francisco, CA 94117

PHONE:

(877) 677-4543

Ohlhoff Recovery Programs

Ohlhoff Recovery Programs provides affordable, quality recovery services to adults and adolescents suffering from issues of substance abuse and chemical dependency. Specific programs include: the Skip Byron Primary Program, a highly structured 30-day clinical program for the beginning stages of recovery; Men’s Residential Program, a six- to 12-month program for working men, with treatment given evenings and weekends; two Women’s Residential Programs – a 30-day intensive program, and a three- to six-month program; and a 13-week intensive outpatient program. All services at Ohlhoff are offered regardless of race, creed, nationality, sexual orientation, relapse history, or physical or mental disability.

Lasting Recovery Outpatient Drug Rehab & Alcohol Treatment Center

ADDRESS:

6046 Cornerstone Ct. W #133
San Diego, CA 92121

PHONE:

(858) 453-4315

Lasting Recovery Outpatient Drug Rehab & Alcohol Treatment Center

The Lasting Recovery Outpatient Drug Rehab & Alcohol Treatment Center Programs, located in the Sorrento Valley area of San Diego, offers outpatient and aftercare services focused on the “biological, interpersonal, holistic and spiritual aspects” of alcoholism, drug addiction and co-occurring disorders. Programs include intensive outpatient, morning and evening outpatient, partial hospitalization, medically assisted treatment, mental and behavioral health, holistic wellness, and aftercare groups. Lasting Recovery’s services are part of the in-patient networks for a wide range of insurance plans.

His House 9th Street

ADDRESS:

239 West 9th St.
Upland, CA 91785

PHONE:

(909) 340-4276

His House 9th Street

His House 9th Street offers a number of treatment options based on the 12-step recovery process. Programs include medically supervised detoxification, residential inpatient and intensive outpatient treatment, individual, group and family therapy, fitness and wellbeing classes, and more. His House is also a dual diagnosis treatment center, addressing co-occurring substance abuse and mental health issues. His House 9th Street is operated by His & Hers Treatment Centers, which operates three men’s and three women’s facilities located throughout San Bernardino County.

Veterans Village of San Diego

ADDRESS:

4141 Pacific Highway
San Diego, CA 92110

PHONE:

(619) 393-2000

Veterans Village of San Diego

The Veterans Village of San Diego (VVSD) assists homeless veterans with substance abuse and mental health issues through a wide range of treatment and supportive services. Its rehabilitation program provides comprehensive clinical assessments, individual, group, couples and family therapy, as well as consultation, referral and collaboration with medical providers. Supportive services include employment development, community reintegration, and housing opportunities. VVSD annually serves more than 2,000 homeless veterans throughout San Diego County.

Centered Health

ADDRESS:

31275 Bailard Rd.
Malibu, CA 90265

PHONE:

(800) 234-5599

Centered Health

Centered Health is a residential rehabilitation center for adolescents struggling with substance abuse, addictions, and co-occurring mental health issues. Patients are provided with a range of “therapeutic, experiential, and clinical evidence-based treatment options.” The center additionally features a school component that allows patients to continue with their education while in treatment. Centered Health accepts private insurance and self-pay, and offers a sliding fee scale based on income.

New Directions for Women

ADDRESS:

2607 Willo Lane
Costa Mesa, CA 92627

PHONE:

(888) 786-0509

New Directions for Women

New Directions for Women is a private, 30-bed facility exclusively for women, treating alcohol, substance abuse, co-occurring disorders, and other chemical dependency issues. New Directions is located in Costa Mesa, near Newport Beach’s Back Bay and Nature Preserve. Treatment services include detoxification, residential rehab, intensive outpatient (IOP), partial hospitalization (PHP), and intensive sober living programs. New Directions accepts a wide range of private insurance options and self-pay, and offers partial scholarships on an as-needed basis.

Sacramento Comprehensive Treatment Center

ADDRESS:

7225 East South Gate Dr., Suite D
Sacramento, CA 95823

PHONE:

(866) 932-1547

Sacramento Comprehensive Treatment Center

The Sacramento Comprehensive Treatment Center (SCTC) specializes in the treatment of individuals suffering from opioid use disorders, including heroin, morphine, and prescription painkillers. In addition to medically assisted treatment options (methadone, Subutex, and Suboxone), SCTC provides detoxification, and comprehensive outpatient, individual and group therapy programs. Payment options include self-payment, private insurance, and Medicaid.

Tarzana Treatment Centers - Tarzana

ADDRESS:

18646 Oxnard St.
Tarzana, CA 91356

PHONE:

(888) 777-8565

Tarzana Treatment Centers - Tarzana

Tarzana Treatment Centers is a full-service non-profit behavioral health organization that offers high-quality, cost-effective substance abuse and mental health treatment services to both youth and adults. Services provided at this Tarzana location include medical detox, residential and outpatient alcohol and drug treatment, methadone and outpatient Suboxone maintenance, and transitional and supportive housing, and many others. In addition to this facility, Tarzana Treatment Centers operates seven other locations in the southern California region. Specific services offered vary by location.

Seasons In Malibu

ADDRESS:

32223 Pacific Coast Highway
Malibu, CA 90265

PHONE:

(866) 780-8539

Seasons In Malibu

Located on a bluff overlooking Matador Beach, Seasons In Malibu is a CARF-accredited, dual-diagnosis luxury center specializing in the treatment of a wide range of addictions, including alcohol, prescription drugs, opiates and cocaine. Seasons In Malibu employs a multi-dimensional and holistic approach to treatment, featuring up to 65 individual therapy sessions per month. Amenities include yoga, meditation, surfing, kayaking, personal trainers, nutrition therapy, art therapy, massage, acupuncture, camping trips, and more.

Paying for Addiction Treatment Centers in California

The hard truth is that treatment at a California rehab center can be an expensive proposition. The cost can range from a few hundred dollars to tens of thousands depending on a number of factors, such as type of service (detox, inpatient residential, IOP, PHP, standard outpatient), facility type (bare-bones, standard, luxury), substance or substances involved, length of treatment stay, and geographic location. Just how high can the cost of treatment go? One particular luxury treatment center located in Malibu reportedly charges some clients over $100,000 a month for its services. Admittedly, this is an extreme example, but it makes an important point: rehab in California isn’t cheap.

The good news is that the cost of treatment at a California rehabilitation center and the amount a patient actually pays for that treatment are rarely the same. That’s because most patients do not pay the full price of rehab services directly out of their pockets. Here’s a brief look at the payment methods most typically used by individuals for funding treatment at a rehab center in California:

  • Private Insurance: Probably the single most common source of financing. Today, almost all private insurance plans – and all policies purchased through Covered California, the state’s ACA insurance marketplace – provide coverage for substance abuse treatment services, including detoxification, inpatient residential and outpatient programs, medication, relapse prevention, and more. It’s important to note, however, that levels of coverage vary by policy, and that individuals are still responsible for deductibles and co-pays under their specific plans.
  • Public Insurance: is essentially California’s version of Medicaid. Medi-Cal offers free and low-cost state and federal government-funded health coverage for qualifying low-income adults, families with children, pregnant women, seniors, disabled persons, and children in foster care. The drug treatment funding source for Medi-Cal patients is Drug Medi-Cal. In order to for Med-Cal to pay for substance abuse services, clients are required to receive their treatment from a Drug Medi-Cal program. For help in locating a publically-funded alcohol or drug treatment facility, call your county’s Department of Human Services office. A directory of contact phone numbers can be found here.
  • Self-Pay: Notwithstanding any public or private insurance coverage, it is likely that an individual seeking rehab in California will be required to pay some amount of the treatment cost out of his or her own pocket. Such self-payment can come from a wide range of sources, including personal checking, savings, credit card accounts, home and personal loans, and contributions from family and friends.
  • Additional Funding Sources: Many treatment centers in California offer their clients help in paying for services through sliding fee scales that base costs on the person’s income level and other relevant factors. Also, some facilities provide payment assistance in the form of grants and scholarships to needy but particularly motivated individuals. Contact the facilities you are considering directly for availability of these funding sources.

Q&A with CA Rehabs Expert Haley Boggs

About Haley Boggs, Certified Substance Abuse Counselor
About Haley Boggs, Certified Substance Abuse Counselor

Haley Boggs is a Certified Substance Abuse Counselor who has worked in the substance abuse treatment field for the past four years. She is currently employed as an Intake Coordinator for His & Her House Treatment Centers and New Creation Treatment Centers in San Bernardino County.

  • Can you tell me a little about His & Her House?

    We are an all-levels-of-care treatment facility, so we go from detox to residential to IOP to sober living. We even offer a college for clients who complete the program or people who are just interested in taking courses to become a substance abuse counselor.

  • What are the most abused substances that you are seeing in your area of California?

    I would say pretty much across the board in California that heroin has become a huge epidemic for those [aged] 14 and into their 20’s. Older people, too. But I’d say 80 percent of the calls that we take are for an opioid addiction.

  • How about the other 20 percent?

    About 10 percent are alcohol, and the other 10 percent would be about five and five benzos and methamphetamine.

  • Why do you think the opioid crisis is happening now? For example, a lot of people with heroin issues got their start with prescription opioids. Do you think that may be part of the cause?

    Absolutely, along with heroin being so accessible. You know, it’s everywhere. Heroin is easier to get right now than methamphetamine.

  • Another problem that many people around the country are encountering now is heroin being cut with fentanyl. Are you seeing that in your area, too?

    Yes, absolutely.

  • Can you tell me a little about the types of patients that are contacting you?

    I would say that we have an even amount of men and women. As far as the older folks go, they’re coming in with the situation that we were just talking about. Their doctors are not prescribing their [opioid] medications anymore, so they are having to result to an alternative substance.

    Are you seeing any particular trending issues or challenges that are being addressed by state or local government in the battle against substance abuse?

    I would say not having enough county-funded facilities, and waiting lists [for treatment] being so long that people can’t get the help they need. Most potential clients have Medi-Cal or Medicaid, and come to us because there aren’t enough facilities for these types of insurance. That’s a big hindrance here in California.

    I can only hope that in the future someone’s going to start taking a look at our drug epidemic and instead of shutting someone out due to not having the money or insurance, we offer them better detox options and residential treatment centers with smaller wait times. And tools to help them succeed. That’s my hope for California.

  • Do you have any advice or suggestions for someone in your area that may be searching for treatment?

    I would recommend trying for a scholarship-based program because there are some facilities where you can apply for and get a full-ride scholarship for treatment. That’s what I always recommend to those calling in, especially for dual-diagnosis clients – placing themselves on yet another waiting list to potentially be scholarshipped into a higher-end facility.