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Find an Alcohol Rehab Center Near You

Alcohol has become a cultural norm: In 2015, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) reported that 81 percent of Americans over the age of 12 used alcohol in their lifetimes. Unfortunately, millions of them are unable to stop. Alcohol addiction can wreak havoc on one’s body and social relationships, and is one of the leading causes of accidental death. Alcohol treatment centers can help alcoholics overcome addiction and live healthy lives.

Expert

William Kent Jewell
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Alcohol has become a cultural norm: In 2015, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) reported that 81 percent of Americans over the age of 12 used alcohol in their lifetimes. Unfortunately, millions of them are unable to stop. Alcohol addiction can wreak havoc on one’s body and social relationships, and is one of the leading causes of accidental death. Alcohol treatment centers can help alcoholics overcome addiction and live healthy lives.

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Signs Someone May Need Alcohol Addiction Rehab

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, people who experience two or more of these red flags may be addicted to alcohol:

  • Drinking more alcohol--or for a longer time period--than intended.
  • Inability to stop drinking despite efforts to do so.
  • Spending a significant amount of time drinking, or having difficulty recovering afterward.
  • Experiencing significant mood changes during or after drinking
  • Drinking despite its negative impact on one’s home, family, career, education, or other responsibilities.
  • Replacing pleasurable activities with drinking.
  • Engaging in potentially harmful situations during or after drinking, such as handling machinery, driving, swimming, or violent activities.
  • Drinking even when it causes feelings of depression and anxiety, or it worsens another health condition.
  • Needing ever more alcohol to get the same effects as before.
  • Developing withdrawal symptoms like nausea, sweating, restlessness, anxiety, depression, sleep problems, and shakiness.

If you or a loved one has any of these symptoms, consider contacting an alcohol treatment center or professional for help.

How Alcohol Treatment Centers can Help

Long-term drinking causes many physical, psychological, and social effects that can be difficult or impossible to reverse. Choosing an alcohol rehab center can quite literally save one’s life. These centers strive to help patients:

  • Reduce or eliminate alcohol use
  • Identify factors that contribute to excessive drinking
  • Treat any co-occurring conditions like anxiety or depression.
  • Improve their ability to function without alcohol
  • Teach stress coping skills
  • Build support systems while repairing social and family relationships
  • Complete the alcohol rehab process
  • Prepare them for the transition to sober living
  • Connect with recovery programs that reinforce alcohol abstinence and prevent relapse.

How Alcohol Rehab Works

All alcohol treatment centers follow the same basic steps:

  • Detox. Patients are treated for withdrawal symptoms after stopping alcohol use.
  • Evaluation. Professionals determine treatment goals and diagnose any coexisting mental health issues that also require treatment.
  • Treatment. Patients undergo treatment for alcohol addiction. See the next session for more details.
  • Recovery. Patients seek support and relapse prevention to maintain an alcohol-free lifestyle.

The specifics of these steps will differ depending on the person and a variety of approaches may be used, including both medical and mental health treatment. The recovery process will place a strong emphasis on external support within the community and family.

Alcohol Addiction Rehab Approaches

There are several approaches rehabs use to treat alcoholism, and the vast majority use a combination of treatments. The following are among the most common.

Medication can be used to either assist in detox or prevent relapse. Currently there are three FDA-approved medications for treating alcohol addiction. Naltrexone blocks both alcohol cravings and the feelings of reward after drinking. Acamprosate (Campral®) is used to combat the symptoms of withdrawal. Disulfiram (Antabuse®) changes how the body breaks down alcohol, producing severe side effects after drinking. Other medications may be used to treat any co-existing mental health conditions.

12-Step Programs

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is a famous example of the mutual-support groups known as 12-step programs, which can be helpful both during and after alcohol rehab. These groups are often anonymous and help link those seeking treatment with a sponsor who has experienced recovery. They provide valuable peer support while undergoing treatment.

Types of Alcohol Treatment Centers

Alcohol treatment programs vary, especially with respect to the type and duration of care they provide. Which suits one best often depends on his or her needs and circumstances. Some of the most common types of alcohol rehab facilities:

Therapeutic alcohol addiction rehab communities

These are long-term, highly structured residential alcohol rehab programs that typically lasts from 6 to 12 months. They focus on the person as a whole and emphasize long-term goals and recovery.

Short-term residential alcohol rehab centers

These are long-term, highly structured residential alcohol rehab programs that typically lasts from 6 to 12 months. They focus on the person as a whole and emphasize long-term goals and recovery.

Recovery or sober housing after alcohol rehab

These are long-term, highly structured residential alcohol rehab programs that typically lasts from 6 to 12 months. They focus on the person as a whole and emphasize long-term goals and recovery.

Outpatient alcohol addiction rehab

These are long-term, highly structured residential alcohol rehab programs that typically lasts from 6 to 12 months. They focus on the person as a whole and emphasize long-term goals and recovery.

How to Choose an Alcohol Rehab Center

Alcohol treatment outcomes depend on a number of features, including the specific nature of one’s condition, the accessibility of services, and the degree to which they collaborate with treatment providers. Nevertheless, there are certain program characteristics universally linked rehab success despite such variation. The National Institute on Drug Abuse advises anyone considering treatment to ask the following questions when finding an alcohol addiction rehab:

  • Does the center use evidence-based treatments, meaning techniques backed by scientific research?
  • Do patients receive personalized treatment plans tailored to their needs?
  • Is the center willing to adjust these treatment plan as needed, even at the end of the process?
  • Is the program long enough to treat the addiction? Research suggests that most people need at least three months of rehab to fully recover.
  • Does the treatment program connect rehab graduates with external recovery support resources like Alcoholics Anonymous?

How to Pay for Alcohol Rehab

Studies suggest only a fraction of alcoholics seek treatment. One of the primary reasons for this: fear of cost. Luckily, there are many programs to help. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has made health insurance more accessible. Health care plans obtained via the ACA’s Health Insurance Marketplace are required to cover the cost of behavioral health care, including alcohol addiction rehab. There may also be local organizations to help fund treatment.

Q&A With Addictions Expert William Kent Jewell

About William Kent Jewell, M.A., MAC, CCDP-D, ICCDP-P, CRADC, ICADC
About William Kent Jewell, M.A., MAC, CCDP-D, ICCDP-P, CRADC, ICADC

William Kent Jewell has over 20 years of experience treating AUD and other substance use conditions. He has a Master’s degree in Counseling Psychology and is an adjunct professor at the University of Saint Mary and Kansas City Kansas Community College. He is the current Executive Director of Benilde Hall in Kansas City, Mo. Benilde Hall provides substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment, transitional living, and a transitional job program for homeless chemically dependent males all in one facility.

  • What should someone expect in alcohol rehab?

    Individuals who come to our facility do not require medical detox or they have already had medical detox and are physically stable for treatment. Anyone entering treatment for substance abuse should expect post-acute withdrawal. In early recovery individuals work on behavioral changes and learning about themselves and the “whys” behind their use. During this stage, they will experience intense cravings and begin to learn what their triggers that are drawing them back to their substance of choice. After the early stages, individuals begin to work on their cognitive changes. Real recovery is a life change which will always require maintenance.

  • What treatment approaches do alcohol rehab centers use?

    We utilize Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) integrated with Motivational Interviewing and Stages of Change.

  • What main barriers to recovery do clients face?

    Themselves.

  • How can clients make an informed decision about alcohol addiction rehab?

    An individual needs to be evaluated by a professional to determine what level of treatment may be required.

  • What do you feel is most important to convey to your clients?

    Recovery is a personal journey of healing the mind, body, and soul. It takes work to be able to live a healthy lifestyle free from drugs and alcohol. Individuals should be informed the journey will not be easy, and it will require a hard look at oneself.

  • Do you have any advice for those researching alcohol treatment centers for themselves or on behalf of a loved one?

    Seek professional guidance. Intervention may be required. Most of all, tough love.

  • Any other thoughts you'd like to add?

    Everyone is recovering from something. No one is alone in their journey.

More Alcohol Treatment FAQs

  • How long does alcohol withdrawal last?

    According to MedlinePlus, the amount of time spent in withdrawal can differ from person to person. While minor symptoms can last weeks, the worst portion hits 24 to 72 hours after the last drink.

  • What makes alcohol so addictive?

    Endorphins are a neurotransmitter that produce a pleasurable feeling. Research suggests that participating in a fun activity–such as exercise or eating ice cream)–could trigger change in the brain that provides a rush of endorphins. This provides a feeling of happiness that is then associated with the activity. Researchers not that the brains of heavy drinkers are more sensitive to endorphins while drinking, producing an even stronger feeling of pleasure.

  • Is alcohol abuse genetic?

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reports that there are genetic influences in the development of an alcohol addiction, but it is not a guarantee to develop the condition. While having a family history of addiction may raise the risk of developing behavioral problems including addiction, there are ways to prevent it. The NIAAA recommends reducing your risk by drinking in moderation as an adult, avoiding underage drinking, and speaking with a health care provider about your concerns.

  • How do I help a loved one with an alcohol addiction?

    Determining if a friend or family member might suffer from an alcohol addiction can be distressing. It’s important to be direct but empathetic with the person. Seek information about AUD and consider having a mental health professional present while addressing your concerns with them. Remember that change will take time and there will be many bumps in the road. Being patient and supportive can make a big difference in the effectiveness of treatment.

  • Does a relapse mean alcohol rehab failed?

    Relapse is very common among those in treatment. Overcoming an addiction is a learning process and won’t be without difficult periods. Many clinicians consider relapse a part of treatment as it provides information to the person about what can cause their drinking. Instead of a total failure, it is better seen as a temporary set-back and learning experience.